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Archive for December, 2009

Fourier transform solutions and associated energy and momentum for the homogeneous Maxwell equation. (rework once more)

Posted by peeterjoot on December 29, 2009

[Click here for a PDF of this post with nicer formatting]. Note that this PDF file is formatted in a wide-for-screen layout that is probably not good for printing.

These notes build on and replace those formerly posted in Energy and momentum for assumed Fourier transform solutions to the homogeneous Maxwell equation.

Motivation and notation.

In Electrodynamic field energy for vacuum (reworked) [1], building on Energy and momentum for Complex electric and magnetic field phasors [2], a derivation for the energy and momentum density was derived for an assumed Fourier series solution to the homogeneous Maxwell’s equation. Here we move to the continuous case examining Fourier transform solutions and the associated energy and momentum density.

A complex (phasor) representation is implied, so taking real parts when all is said and done is required of the fields. For the energy momentum tensor the Geometric Algebra form, modified for complex fields, is used

\begin{aligned}T(a) = -\frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \text{Real} \Bigl( {{F}}^{*} a F \Bigr).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.1)

The assumed four vector potential will be written

\begin{aligned}A(\mathbf{x}, t) = A^\mu(\mathbf{x}, t) \gamma_\mu = \frac{1}{{(\sqrt{2 \pi})^3}} \int A(\mathbf{k}, t) e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.2)

Subject to the requirement that A is a solution of Maxwell’s equation

\begin{aligned}\nabla (\nabla \wedge A) = 0.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.3)

To avoid latex hell, no special notation will be used for the Fourier coefficients,

\begin{aligned}A(\mathbf{k}, t) = \frac{1}{{(\sqrt{2 \pi})^3}} \int A(\mathbf{x}, t) e^{-i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{x}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.4)

When convenient and unambiguous, this (\mathbf{k},t) dependence will be implied.

Having picked a time and space representation for the field, it will be natural to express both the four potential and the gradient as scalar plus spatial vector, instead of using the Dirac basis. For the gradient this is

\begin{aligned}\nabla &= \gamma^\mu \partial_\mu = (\partial_0 - \boldsymbol{\nabla}) \gamma_0 = \gamma_0 (\partial_0 + \boldsymbol{\nabla}),\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.5)

and for the four potential (or the Fourier transform functions), this is

\begin{aligned}A &= \gamma_\mu A^\mu = (\phi + \mathbf{A}) \gamma_0 = \gamma_0 (\phi - \mathbf{A}).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.6)

Setup

The field bivector F = \nabla \wedge A is required for the energy momentum tensor. This is

\begin{aligned}\nabla \wedge A&= \frac{1}{{2}}\left( \stackrel{ \rightarrow }{\nabla} A - A \stackrel{ \leftarrow }{\nabla} \right) \\ &= \frac{1}{{2}}\left( (\stackrel{ \rightarrow }{\partial}_0 - \stackrel{ \rightarrow }{\boldsymbol{\nabla}}) \gamma_0 \gamma_0 (\phi - \mathbf{A})-(\phi + \mathbf{A}) \gamma_0 \gamma_0 (\stackrel{ \leftarrow }{\partial}_0 + \stackrel{ \leftarrow }{\boldsymbol{\nabla}})\right) \\ &= -\boldsymbol{\nabla} \phi -\partial_0 \mathbf{A} + \frac{1}{{2}}(\stackrel{ \rightarrow }{\boldsymbol{\nabla}} \mathbf{A} - \mathbf{A} \stackrel{ \leftarrow }{\boldsymbol{\nabla}})\end{aligned}

This last term is a spatial curl and the field is then

\begin{aligned}F = -\boldsymbol{\nabla} \phi -\partial_0 \mathbf{A} + \boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(2.7)

Applied to the Fourier representation this is

\begin{aligned}F =\frac{1}{{(\sqrt{2 \pi})^3}} \int\left(- \frac{1}{c} \dot{\mathbf{A}}- i \mathbf{k} \phi+ i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}\right)e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(2.8)

It is only the real parts of this that we are actually interested in, unless physical meaning can be assigned to the complete complex vector field.

Constraints supplied by Maxwell’s equation.

A Fourier transform solution of Maxwell’s vacuum equation \nabla F = 0 has been assumed. Having expressed the Faraday bivector in terms of spatial vector quantities, it is more convenient to do this back substitution into after pre-multiplying Maxwell’s equation by \gamma_0, namely

\begin{aligned}0&= \gamma_0 \nabla F \\ &= (\partial_0 + \boldsymbol{\nabla}) F.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.9)

Applied to the spatially decomposed field as specified in (2.7), this is

\begin{aligned}0&=-\partial_0 \boldsymbol{\nabla} \phi-\partial_{00} \mathbf{A}+ \partial_0 \boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A}-\boldsymbol{\nabla}^2 \phi- \boldsymbol{\nabla} \partial_0 \mathbf{A}+ \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot (\boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A} ) \\ &=- \partial_0 \boldsymbol{\nabla} \phi - \boldsymbol{\nabla}^2 \phi- \partial_{00} \mathbf{A}- \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \partial_0 \mathbf{A}+ \boldsymbol{\nabla}^2 \mathbf{A} - \boldsymbol{\nabla} (\boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A} ) \\ \end{aligned}

All grades of this equation must simultaneously equal zero, and the bivector grades have canceled (assuming commuting space and time partials), leaving two equations of constraint for the system

\begin{aligned}0 &=\boldsymbol{\nabla}^2 \phi + \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \partial_0 \mathbf{A}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.11)

\begin{aligned}0 &=\partial_{00} \mathbf{A} - \boldsymbol{\nabla}^2 \mathbf{A}+ \boldsymbol{\nabla} \partial_0 \phi + \boldsymbol{\nabla} ( \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A} )\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.12)

It is immediately evident that a gauge transformation could be immediately helpful to simplify things. In [3] the gauge choice \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A} = 0 is used. From (3.11) this implies that \boldsymbol{\nabla}^2 \phi = 0. Bohm argues that for this current and charge free case this implies \phi = 0, but he also has a periodicity constraint. Without a periodicity constraint it is easy to manufacture non-zero counterexamples. One is a linear function in the space and time coordinates

\begin{aligned}\phi = p x + q y + r z + s t\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.13)

This is a valid scalar potential provided that the wave equation for the vector potential is also a solution. We can however, force \phi = 0 by making the transformation A^\mu \rightarrow A^\mu + \partial^\mu \psi, which in non-covariant notation is

\begin{aligned}\phi &\rightarrow \phi + \frac{1}{c} \partial_t \psi \\ \mathbf{A} &\rightarrow \phi - \boldsymbol{\nabla} \psi\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.14)

If the transformed field \phi' = \phi + \partial_t \psi/c can be forced to zero, then the complexity of the associated Maxwell equations are reduced. In particular, antidifferentiation of \phi = -(1/c) \partial_t \psi, yields

\begin{aligned}\psi(\mathbf{x},t) = \psi(\mathbf{x}, 0) - c \int_{\tau=0}^t \phi(\mathbf{x}, \tau) d\tau.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.16)

Dropping primes, the transformed Maxwell equations now take the form

\begin{aligned}0 &= \partial_t( \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A} )\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.17)

\begin{aligned}0 &=\partial_{00} \mathbf{A} - \boldsymbol{\nabla}^2 \mathbf{A} + \boldsymbol{\nabla} (\boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A} ).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.18)

There are two classes of solutions that stand out for these equations. If the vector potential is constant in time \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{x},t) = \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{x}), Maxwell’s equations are reduced to the single equation

\begin{aligned}0&= - \boldsymbol{\nabla}^2 \mathbf{A} + \boldsymbol{\nabla} (\boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A} ).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.19)

Observe that a gradient can be factored out of this equation

\begin{aligned}- \boldsymbol{\nabla}^2 \mathbf{A} + \boldsymbol{\nabla} (\boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A} )&=\boldsymbol{\nabla} (-\boldsymbol{\nabla} \mathbf{A} + \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A} ) \\ &=-\boldsymbol{\nabla} (\boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A}).\end{aligned}

The solutions are then those \mathbf{A}s that satisfy both

\begin{aligned}0 &= \partial_t \mathbf{A} \\ 0 &= \boldsymbol{\nabla} (\boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A}).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.20)

In particular any non-time dependent potential \mathbf{A} with constant curl provides a solution to Maxwell’s equations. There may be other solutions to (3.19) too that are more general. Returning to (3.17) a second way to satisfy these equations stands out. Instead of requiring of \mathbf{A} constant curl, constant divergence with respect to the time partial eliminates (3.17). The simplest resulting equations are those for which the divergence is a constant in time and space (such as zero). The solution set are then spanned by the vectors \mathbf{A} for which

\begin{aligned}\text{constant} &= \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A} \end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.22)

\begin{aligned}0 &= \frac{1}{{c^2}} \partial_{tt} \mathbf{A} - \boldsymbol{\nabla}^2 \mathbf{A}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.23)

Any \mathbf{A} that both has constant divergence and satisfies the wave equation will via (2.7) then produce a solution to Maxwell’s equation.

Maxwell equation constraints applied to the assumed Fourier solutions.

Let’s consider Maxwell’s equations in all three forms, (3.11), (3.20), and (3.22) and apply these constraints to the assumed Fourier solution.

In all cases the starting point is a pair of Fourier transform relationships, where the Fourier transforms are the functions to be determined

\begin{aligned}\phi(\mathbf{x}, t) &= (2 \pi)^{-3/2} \int \phi(\mathbf{k}, t) e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k} \end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.24)

\begin{aligned}\mathbf{A}(\mathbf{x}, t) &= (2 \pi)^{-3/2} \int \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t) e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k} \end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.25)

Case I. Constant time vector potential. Scalar potential eliminated by gauge transformation.

From (4.24) we require

\begin{aligned}0 = (2 \pi)^{-3/2} \int \partial_t \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t) e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.26)

So the Fourier transform also cannot have any time dependence, and we have

\begin{aligned}\mathbf{A}(\mathbf{x}, t) &= (2 \pi)^{-3/2} \int \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}) e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k} \end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.27)

What is the curl of this? Temporarily falling back to coordinates is easiest for this calculation

\begin{aligned}\boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}) e^{i\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}}&=\sigma_m \partial_m \wedge \sigma_n A^n(\mathbf{k}) e^{i \mathbf{x} \cdot \mathbf{x}} \\ &=\sigma_m \wedge \sigma_n A^n(\mathbf{k}) i k^m e^{i \mathbf{x} \cdot \mathbf{x}} \\ &=i\mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}) e^{i \mathbf{x} \cdot \mathbf{x}} \\ \end{aligned}

This gives

\begin{aligned}\boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{x}, t) &= (2 \pi)^{-3/2} \int i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}) e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.28)

We want to equate the divergence of this to zero. Neglecting the integral and constant factor this requires

\begin{aligned}0 &= \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \left( i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A} e^{i\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} \right) \\ &= {\left\langle{{ \sigma_m \partial_m i (\mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}) e^{i\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} }}\right\rangle}_{1} \\ &= -{\left\langle{{ \sigma_m (\mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}) k^m e^{i\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} }}\right\rangle}_{1} \\ &= -\mathbf{k} \cdot (\mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}) e^{i\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} \\ \end{aligned}

Requiring that the plane spanned by \mathbf{k} and \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}) be perpendicular to \mathbf{k} implies that \mathbf{A} \propto \mathbf{k}. The solution set is then completely described by functions of the form

\begin{aligned}\mathbf{A}(\mathbf{x}, t) &= (2 \pi)^{-3/2} \int \mathbf{k} \psi(\mathbf{k}) e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k},\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.29)

where \psi(\mathbf{k}) is an arbitrary scalar valued function. This is however, an extremely uninteresting solution since the curl is uniformly zero

\begin{aligned}F &= \boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A} \\ &= (2 \pi)^{-3/2} \int (i \mathbf{k}) \wedge \mathbf{k} \psi(\mathbf{k}) e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned}

Since \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{k} = 0, when all is said and done the \phi = 0, \partial_t \mathbf{A} = 0 case appears to have no non-trivial (zero) solutions. Moving on, …

Case II. Constant vector potential divergence. Scalar potential eliminated by gauge transformation.

Next in the order of complexity is consideration of the case (3.22). Here we also have \phi = 0, eliminated by gauge transformation, and are looking for solutions with the constraint

\begin{aligned}\text{constant} &= \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{x}, t) \\ &= (2 \pi)^{-3/2} \int i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t) e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned}

How can this constraint be enforced? The only obvious way is a requirement for \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t) to be zero for all (\mathbf{k},t), meaning that our to be determined Fourier transform coefficients are required to be perpendicular to the wave number vector parameters at all times.

The remainder of Maxwell’s equations, (3.23) impose the addition constraint on the Fourier transform \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k},t)

\begin{aligned}0 &= (2 \pi)^{-3/2} \int \left( \frac{1}{{c^2}} \partial_{tt} \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t) - i^2 \mathbf{k}^2 \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t)\right) e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.30)

For zero equality for all \mathbf{x} it appears that we require the Fourier transforms \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}) to be harmonic in time

\begin{aligned}\partial_{tt} \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t) = - c^2 \mathbf{k}^2 \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.31)

This has the familiar exponential solutions

\begin{aligned}\mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t) = \mathbf{A}_{\pm}(\mathbf{k}) e^{ \pm i c {\left\lvert{\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert} t },\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.32)

also subject to a requirement that \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}) = 0. Our field, where the \mathbf{A}_{\pm}(\mathbf{k}) are to be determined by initial time conditions, is by (2.7) of the form

\begin{aligned}F(\mathbf{x}, t)= \text{Real} \frac{i}{(\sqrt{2\pi})^3} \int \Bigl( -{\left\lvert{\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert} \mathbf{A}_{+}(\mathbf{k}) + \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}_{+}(\mathbf{k}) \Bigr) \exp(i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} + i c {\left\lvert{\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert} t) d^3 \mathbf{k}+ \text{Real} \frac{i}{(\sqrt{2\pi})^3} \int \Bigl( {\left\lvert{\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert} \mathbf{A}_{-}(\mathbf{k}) + \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}_{-}(\mathbf{k}) \Bigr) \exp(i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} - i c {\left\lvert{\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert} t) d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.33)

Since 0 = \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}_{\pm}(\mathbf{k}), we have \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}_{\pm}(\mathbf{k}) = \mathbf{k} \mathbf{A}_{\pm}. This allows for factoring out of {\left\lvert{\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}. The structure of the solution is not changed by incorporating the i (2\pi)^{-3/2} {\left\lvert{\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert} factors into \mathbf{A}_{\pm}, leaving the field having the general form

\begin{aligned}F(\mathbf{x}, t)= \text{Real} \int ( \hat{\mathbf{k}} - 1 ) \mathbf{A}_{+}(\mathbf{k}) \exp(i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} + i c {\left\lvert{\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert} t) d^3 \mathbf{k}+ \text{Real} \int ( \hat{\mathbf{k}} + 1 ) \mathbf{A}_{-}(\mathbf{k}) \exp(i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} - i c {\left\lvert{\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert} t) d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.34)

The original meaning of \mathbf{A}_{\pm} as Fourier transforms of the vector potential is obscured by the tidy up change to absorb {\left\lvert{\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}, but the geometry of the solution is clearer this way.

It is also particularly straightforward to confirm that \gamma_0 \nabla F = 0 separately for either half of (4.34).

Case III. Non-zero scalar potential. No gauge transformation.

Now lets work from (3.11). In particular, a divergence operation can be factored from (3.11), for

\begin{aligned}0 = \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot (\boldsymbol{\nabla} \phi + \partial_0 \mathbf{A}).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.35)

Right off the top, there is a requirement for

\begin{aligned}\text{constant} = \boldsymbol{\nabla} \phi + \partial_0 \mathbf{A}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.36)

In terms of the Fourier transforms this is

\begin{aligned}\text{constant} = \frac{1}{{(\sqrt{2 \pi})^3}} \int \Bigl(i \mathbf{k} \phi(\mathbf{k}, t) + \frac{1}{c} \partial_t \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t)\Bigr)e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.37)

Are there any ways for this to equal a constant for all \mathbf{x} without requiring that constant to be zero? Assuming no for now, and that this constant must be zero, this implies a coupling between the \phi and \mathbf{A} Fourier transforms of the form

\begin{aligned}\phi(\mathbf{k}, t) = -\frac{1}{{i c \mathbf{k}}} \partial_t \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.38)

A secondary implication is that \partial_t \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t) \propto \mathbf{k} or else \phi(\mathbf{k}, t) is not a scalar. We had a transverse solution by requiring via gauge transformation that \phi = 0, and here we have instead the vector potential in the propagation direction.

A secondary confirmation that this is a required coupling between the scalar and vector potential can be had by evaluating the divergence equation of (4.35)

\begin{aligned}0 = \frac{1}{{(\sqrt{2 \pi})^3}} \int \Bigl(- \mathbf{k}^2 \phi(\mathbf{k}, t) + \frac{i\mathbf{k}}{c} \cdot \partial_t \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t)\Bigr)e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.39)

Rearranging this also produces (4.38). We want to now substitute this relationship into (3.12).

Starting with just the \partial_0 \phi - \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A} part we have

\begin{aligned}\partial_0 \phi + \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A}&=\frac{1}{{(\sqrt{2 \pi})^3}} \int \Bigl(\frac{i}{c^2 \mathbf{k}} \partial_{tt} \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t) + i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}\Bigr)e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.40)

Taking the gradient of this brings down a factor of i\mathbf{k} for

\begin{aligned}\boldsymbol{\nabla} (\partial_0 \phi + \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A})&=-\frac{1}{{(\sqrt{2 \pi})^3}} \int \Bigl(\frac{1}{c^2} \partial_{tt} \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t) + \mathbf{k} (\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A})\Bigr)e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.41)

(3.12) in its entirety is now

\begin{aligned}0 &=\frac{1}{{(\sqrt{2 \pi})^3}} \int \Bigl(- (i\mathbf{k})^2 \mathbf{A}+ \mathbf{k} (\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A})\Bigr)e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.42)

This isn’t terribly pleasant looking. Perhaps going the other direction. We could write

\begin{aligned}\phi = \frac{i}{c \mathbf{k}} \frac{\partial {\mathbf{A}}}{\partial {t}} = \frac{i}{c} \frac{\partial {\psi}}{\partial {t}},\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.43)

so that

\begin{aligned}\mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t) = \mathbf{k} \psi(\mathbf{k}, t).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.44)

\begin{aligned}0 &=\frac{1}{{(\sqrt{2 \pi})^3}} \int \Bigl(\frac{1}{{c^2}} \mathbf{k} \psi_{tt}- \boldsymbol{\nabla}^2 \mathbf{k} \psi + \boldsymbol{\nabla} \frac{i}{c^2} \psi_{tt}+\boldsymbol{\nabla}( \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot (\mathbf{k} \psi) )\Bigr)e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k} \\ \end{aligned}

Note that the gradients here operate on everything to the right, including and especially the exponential. Each application of the gradient brings down an additional i\mathbf{k} factor, and we have

\begin{aligned}\frac{1}{{(\sqrt{2 \pi})^3}} \int \mathbf{k} \Bigl(\frac{1}{{c^2}} \psi_{tt}- i^2 \mathbf{k}^2 \psi + \frac{i^2}{c^2} \psi_{tt}+i^2 \mathbf{k}^2 \psi \Bigr)e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned}

This is identically zero, so we see that this second equation provides no additional information. That is somewhat surprising since there is not a whole lot of constraints supplied by the first equation. The function \psi(\mathbf{k}, t) can be anything. Understanding of this curiosity comes from computation of the Faraday bivector itself. From (2.7), that is

\begin{aligned}F = \frac{1}{{(\sqrt{2 \pi})^3}} \int \Bigl(-i \mathbf{k} \frac{i}{c}\psi_t - \frac{1}{c} \mathbf{k} \psi_t + i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{k} \psi\Bigr)e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(4.45)

All terms cancel, so we see that a non-zero \phi leads to F = 0, as was the case when considering (4.24) (a case that also resulted in \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}) \propto \mathbf{k}).

Can this Fourier representation lead to a non-transverse solution to Maxwell’s equation? If so, it is not obvious how.

The energy momentum tensor

The energy momentum tensor is then

\begin{aligned}T(a) &= -\frac{\epsilon_0}{2 (2 \pi)^3} \text{Real} \iint\left(- \frac{1}{c} {{\dot{\mathbf{A}}}}^{*}(\mathbf{k}',t)+ i \mathbf{k}' {{\phi}}^{*}(\mathbf{k}', t)- i \mathbf{k}' \wedge {\mathbf{A}}^{*}(\mathbf{k}', t)\right)a\left(- \frac{1}{c} \dot{\mathbf{A}}(\mathbf{k}, t)- i \mathbf{k} \phi(\mathbf{k}, t)+ i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t)\right)e^{i (\mathbf{k} -\mathbf{k}') \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k} d^3 \mathbf{k}'.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(5.46)

Observing that \gamma_0 commutes with spatial bivectors and anticommutes with spatial vectors, and writing \sigma_\mu = \gamma_\mu \gamma_0, the tensor splits neatly into scalar and spatial vector components

\begin{aligned}T(\gamma_\mu) \cdot \gamma_0 &= \frac{\epsilon_0}{2 (2 \pi)^3} \text{Real} \iint\left\langle{{\left(\frac{1}{c} {{\dot{\mathbf{A}}}}^{*}(\mathbf{k}',t)- i \mathbf{k}' {{\phi}}^{*}(\mathbf{k}', t)+ i \mathbf{k}' \wedge {\mathbf{A}}^{*}(\mathbf{k}', t)\right)\sigma_\mu\left(\frac{1}{c} \dot{\mathbf{A}}(\mathbf{k}, t)+ i \mathbf{k} \phi(\mathbf{k}, t)+ i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t)\right)}}\right\rangle e^{i (\mathbf{k} -\mathbf{k}') \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k} d^3 \mathbf{k}' \\ T(\gamma_\mu) \wedge \gamma_0 &= \frac{\epsilon_0}{2 (2 \pi)^3} \text{Real} \iint{\left\langle{{\left(\frac{1}{c} {{\dot{\mathbf{A}}}}^{*}(\mathbf{k}',t)- i \mathbf{k}' {{\phi}}^{*}(\mathbf{k}', t)+ i \mathbf{k}' \wedge {\mathbf{A}}^{*}(\mathbf{k}', t)\right)\sigma_\mu\left(\frac{1}{c} \dot{\mathbf{A}}(\mathbf{k}, t)+ i \mathbf{k} \phi(\mathbf{k}, t)+ i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t)\right)}}\right\rangle}_{1}e^{i (\mathbf{k} -\mathbf{k}') \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k} d^3 \mathbf{k}'.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(5.47)

In particular for \mu = 0, we have

\begin{aligned}H &\equiv T(\gamma_0) \cdot \gamma_0 = \frac{\epsilon_0}{2 (2 \pi)^3} \text{Real} \iint\left(\left(\frac{1}{c} {{\dot{\mathbf{A}}}}^{*}(\mathbf{k}',t)- i \mathbf{k}' {{\phi}}^{*}(\mathbf{k}', t)\right)\cdot\left(\frac{1}{c} \dot{\mathbf{A}}(\mathbf{k}, t)+ i \mathbf{k} \phi(\mathbf{k}, t)\right)- (\mathbf{k}' \wedge {\mathbf{A}}^{*}(\mathbf{k}', t)) \cdot (\mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t))\right)e^{i (\mathbf{k} -\mathbf{k}') \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k} d^3 \mathbf{k}' \\ \mathbf{P} &\equiv T(\gamma_\mu) \wedge \gamma_0 = \frac{\epsilon_0}{2 (2 \pi)^3} \text{Real} \iint\left(i\left(\frac{1}{c} {{\dot{\mathbf{A}}}}^{*}(\mathbf{k}',t)- i \mathbf{k}' {{\phi}}^{*}(\mathbf{k}', t)\right) \cdot\left(\mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t)\right)-i\left(\frac{1}{c} \dot{\mathbf{A}}(\mathbf{k}, t)+ i \mathbf{k} \phi(\mathbf{k}, t)\right)\cdot\left(\mathbf{k}' \wedge {\mathbf{A}}^{*}(\mathbf{k}', t)\right)\right)e^{i (\mathbf{k} -\mathbf{k}') \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k} d^3 \mathbf{k}'.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(5.49)

Integrating this over all space and identification of the delta function

\begin{aligned}\delta(\mathbf{k}) \equiv \frac{1}{{(2 \pi)^3}} \int e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} d^3 \mathbf{x},\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(5.51)

reduces the tensor to a single integral in the continuous angular wave number space of \mathbf{k}.

\begin{aligned}\int T(a) d^3 \mathbf{x} &= -\frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \text{Real} \int\left(- \frac{1}{c} {{\dot{\mathbf{A}}}}^{*}+ i \mathbf{k} {{\phi}}^{*}- i \mathbf{k} \wedge {\mathbf{A}}^{*}\right)a\left(- \frac{1}{c} \dot{\mathbf{A}}- i \mathbf{k} \phi+ i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}\right)d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(5.52)

Or,

\begin{aligned}\int T(\gamma_\mu) \gamma_0 d^3 \mathbf{x} =\frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \text{Real} \int{\left\langle{{\left(\frac{1}{c} {{\dot{\mathbf{A}}}}^{*}- i \mathbf{k} {{\phi}}^{*}+ i \mathbf{k} \wedge {\mathbf{A}}^{*}\right)\sigma_\mu\left(\frac{1}{c} \dot{\mathbf{A}}+ i \mathbf{k} \phi+ i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}\right)}}\right\rangle}_{{0,1}}d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(5.53)

Multiplying out (5.53) yields for \int H

\begin{aligned}\int H d^3 \mathbf{x} &=\frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \int d^3 \mathbf{k} \left(\frac{1}{{c^2}} {\left\lvert{\dot{\mathbf{A}}}\right\rvert}^2 + \mathbf{k}^2 ({\left\lvert{\phi}\right\rvert}^2 + {\left\lvert{\mathbf{A}}\right\rvert}^2 )- {\left\lvert{\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}}\right\rvert}^2+ 2 \frac{\mathbf{k}}{c} \cdot \text{Real}( i {{\phi}}^{*} \dot{\mathbf{A}} )\right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(5.54)

Recall that the only non-trivial solution we found for the assumed Fourier transform representation of F was for \phi = 0, \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t) = 0. Thus we have for the energy density integrated over all space, just

\begin{aligned}\int H d^3 \mathbf{x} &=\frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \int d^3 \mathbf{k} \left(\frac{1}{{c^2}} {\left\lvert{\dot{\mathbf{A}}}\right\rvert}^2 + \mathbf{k}^2 {\left\lvert{\mathbf{A}}\right\rvert}^2 \right).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(5.55)

Observe that we have the structure of a Harmonic oscillator for the energy of the radiation system. What is the canonical momentum for this system? Will it correspond to the Poynting vector, integrated over all space?

Let’s reduce the vector component of (5.53), after first imposing the \phi=0, and \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A} = 0 conditions used to above for our harmonic oscillator form energy relationship. This is

\begin{aligned}\int \mathbf{P} d^3 \mathbf{x} &=\frac{\epsilon_0}{2 c} \text{Real} \int d^3 \mathbf{k} \left( i {\mathbf{A}}^{*}_t \cdot (\mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A})+ i (\mathbf{k} \wedge {\mathbf{A}}^{*}) \cdot \mathbf{A}_t\right) \\ &=\frac{\epsilon_0}{2 c} \text{Real} \int d^3 \mathbf{k} \left( -i ({\mathbf{A}}^{*}_t \cdot \mathbf{A}) \mathbf{k}+ i \mathbf{k} ({\mathbf{A}}^{*} \cdot \mathbf{A}_t)\right)\end{aligned}

This is just

\begin{aligned}\int \mathbf{P} d^3 \mathbf{x} &=\frac{\epsilon_0}{c} \text{Real} i \int \mathbf{k} ({\mathbf{A}}^{*} \cdot \mathbf{A}_t) d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(5.56)

Recall that the Fourier transforms for the transverse propagation case had the form \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t) = \mathbf{A}_{\pm}(\mathbf{k}) e^{\pm i c {\left\lvert{\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert} t}, where the minus generated the advanced wave, and the plus the receding wave. With substitution of the vector potential for the advanced wave into the energy and momentum results of (5.55) and (5.56) respectively, we have

\begin{aligned}\int H d^3 \mathbf{x}   &= \epsilon_0 \int \mathbf{k}^2 {\left\lvert{\mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k})}\right\rvert}^2 d^3 \mathbf{k} \\ \int \mathbf{P} d^3 \mathbf{x} &= \epsilon_0 \int \hat{\mathbf{k}} \mathbf{k}^2 {\left\lvert{\mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k})}\right\rvert}^2 d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(5.57)

After a somewhat circuitous route, this has the relativistic symmetry that is expected. In particular the for the complete \mu=0 tensor we have after integration over all space

\begin{aligned}\int T(\gamma_0) \gamma_0 d^3 \mathbf{x} = \epsilon_0 \int (1 + \hat{\mathbf{k}}) \mathbf{k}^2 {\left\lvert{\mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k})}\right\rvert}^2 d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(5.59)

The receding wave solution would give the same result, but directed as 1 - \hat{\mathbf{k}} instead.

Observe that we also have the four divergence conservation statement that is expected

\begin{aligned}\frac{\partial {}}{\partial {t}} \int H d^3 \mathbf{x} + \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \int c \mathbf{P} d^3 \mathbf{x} &= 0.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(5.60)

This follows trivially since both the derivatives are zero. If the integration region was to be more specific instead of a 0 + 0 = 0 relationship, we’d have the power flux {\partial {H}}/{\partial {t}} equal in magnitude to the momentum change through a bounding surface. For a more general surface the time and spatial dependencies shouldn’t necessarily vanish, but we should still have this radiation energy momentum conservation.

References

[1] Peeter Joot. Electrodynamic field energy for vacuum. [online]. http://sites.google.com/site/peeterjoot/math2009/fourierMaxVac.pdf.

[2] Peeter Joot. {Energy and momentum for Complex electric and magnetic field phasors.} [online]. http://sites.google.com/site/peeterjoot/math2009/complexFieldEnergy.pdf.

[3] D. Bohm. Quantum Theory. Courier Dover Publications, 1989.

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undergrad thesis: strip mining and loop transformations for the Jasmine (polaris based) compiler

Posted by peeterjoot on December 23, 2009

Found my old undergrad thesis, and have now put it on the internet for posterity.

This was a somewhat goofy project. I was assigned to continue work on a previous undergrad thesis project, where a matrix library had been written for loop transformations.

This was to be plugged into an optimizing compiler that took Fortran code and produced different fortran code. The idea was that the compiler could be guided into blocking large memory intensive operations into ones that used the cache better, but the whole approach was very academic, requiring specially contrived code and compiler interaction.

The one thing that I liked about this was that, in the end, it did work nicely. I measured a 12x times improvement in the matrix multiplier when the right blocking size was picked. Picking that blocking size required experiment, so practical application of these methods were a long way off.

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Energy and momentum for assumed Fourier transform solutions to the homogeneous Maxwell equation.

Posted by peeterjoot on December 22, 2009

[Click here for a PDF of this post with nicer formatting]

Motivation and notation.

In Electrodynamic field energy for vacuum (reworked) [1], building on Energy and momentum for Complex electric and magnetic field phasors [2] a derivation for the energy and momentum density was derived for an assumed Fourier series solution to the homogeneous Maxwell’s equation. Here we move to the continuous case examining Fourier transform solutions and the associated energy and momentum density.

A complex (phasor) representation is implied, so taking real parts when all is said and done is required of the fields. For the energy momentum tensor the Geometric Algebra form, modified for complex fields, is used

\begin{aligned}T(a) = -\frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \text{Real} \Bigl( {{F}}^{*} a F \Bigr).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.1)

The assumed four vector potential will be written

\begin{aligned}A(\mathbf{x}, t) = A^\mu(\mathbf{x}, t) \gamma_\mu = \frac{1}{{(\sqrt{2 \pi})^3}} \int A(\mathbf{k}, t) e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.2)

Subject to the requirement that A is a solution of Maxwell’s equation

\begin{aligned}\nabla (\nabla \wedge A) = 0.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.3)

To avoid latex hell, no special notation will be used for the Fourier coefficients,

\begin{aligned}A(\mathbf{k}, t) = \frac{1}{{(\sqrt{2 \pi})^3}} \int A(\mathbf{x}, t) e^{-i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{x}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.4)

When convenient and unambiguous, this (\mathbf{k},t) dependence will be implied.

Having picked a time and space representation for the field, it will be natural to express both the four potential and the gradient as scalar plus spatial vector, instead of using the Dirac basis. For the gradient this is

\begin{aligned}\nabla &= \gamma^\mu \partial_\mu = (\partial_0 - \boldsymbol{\nabla}) \gamma_0 = \gamma_0 (\partial_0 + \boldsymbol{\nabla}),\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.5)

and for the four potential (or the Fourier transform functions), this is

\begin{aligned}A &= \gamma_\mu A^\mu = (\phi + \mathbf{A}) \gamma_0 = \gamma_0 (\phi - \mathbf{A}).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.6)

Setup

The field bivector F = \nabla \wedge A is required for the energy momentum tensor. This is

\begin{aligned}\nabla \wedge A&= \frac{1}{{2}}\left( \stackrel{ \rightarrow }{\nabla} A - A \stackrel{ \leftarrow }{\nabla} \right) \\ &= \frac{1}{{2}}\left( (\stackrel{ \rightarrow }{\partial}_0 - \stackrel{ \rightarrow }{\boldsymbol{\nabla}}) \gamma_0 \gamma_0 (\phi - \mathbf{A})- (\phi + \mathbf{A}) \gamma_0 \gamma_0 (\stackrel{ \leftarrow }{\partial}_0 + \stackrel{ \leftarrow }{\boldsymbol{\nabla}})\right) \\ &= -\boldsymbol{\nabla} \phi -\partial_0 \mathbf{A} + \frac{1}{{2}}(\stackrel{ \rightarrow }{\boldsymbol{\nabla}} \mathbf{A} - \mathbf{A} \stackrel{ \leftarrow }{\boldsymbol{\nabla}}) \end{aligned}

This last term is a spatial curl and the field is then

\begin{aligned}F = -\boldsymbol{\nabla} \phi -\partial_0 \mathbf{A} + \boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A} \end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(2.7)

Applied to the Fourier representation this is

\begin{aligned}F = \frac{1}{{(\sqrt{2 \pi})^3}} \int \left( - \frac{1}{{c}} \dot{\mathbf{A}}- i \mathbf{k} \phi+ i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}\right)e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(2.8)

The energy momentum tensor is then

\begin{aligned}T(a) &= -\frac{\epsilon_0}{2 (2 \pi)^3} \text{Real} \iint \left( - \frac{1}{{c}} {{\dot{\mathbf{A}}}}^{*}(\mathbf{k}',t)+ i \mathbf{k}' {{\phi}}^{*}(\mathbf{k}', t)- i \mathbf{k}' \wedge {\mathbf{A}}^{*}(\mathbf{k}', t)\right)a\left( - \frac{1}{{c}} \dot{\mathbf{A}}(\mathbf{k}, t)- i \mathbf{k} \phi(\mathbf{k}, t)+ i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{k}, t)\right)e^{i (\mathbf{k} -\mathbf{k}') \cdot \mathbf{x} } d^3 \mathbf{k} d^3 \mathbf{k}'.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(2.9)

The tensor integrated over all space. Energy and momentum?

Integrating this over all space and identification of the delta function

\begin{aligned}\delta(\mathbf{k}) \equiv \frac{1}{{(2 \pi)^3}} \int e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} d^3 \mathbf{x},\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.10)

reduces the tensor to a single integral in the continuous angular wave number space of \mathbf{k}.

\begin{aligned}\int T(a) d^3 \mathbf{x} &= -\frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \text{Real} \int \left( - \frac{1}{{c}} {{\dot{\mathbf{A}}}}^{*}+ i \mathbf{k} {{\phi}}^{*}- i \mathbf{k} \wedge {\mathbf{A}}^{*}\right)a\left( - \frac{1}{{c}} \dot{\mathbf{A}}- i \mathbf{k} \phi+ i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}\right)d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.11)

Observing that \gamma_0 commutes with spatial bivectors and anticommutes with spatial vectors, and writing \sigma_\mu = \gamma_\mu \gamma_0, one has

\begin{aligned}\int T(\gamma_\mu) \gamma_0 d^3 \mathbf{x} = \frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \text{Real} \int {\left\langle{{\left( \frac{1}{{c}} {{\dot{\mathbf{A}}}}^{*}- i \mathbf{k} {{\phi}}^{*}+ i \mathbf{k} \wedge {\mathbf{A}}^{*}\right)\sigma_\mu\left( \frac{1}{{c}} \dot{\mathbf{A}}+ i \mathbf{k} \phi+ i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}\right)}}\right\rangle}_{{0,1}}d^3 \mathbf{k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.12)

The scalar and spatial vector grade selection operator has been added for convenience and does not change the result since those are necessarily the only grades anyhow. The post multiplication by the observer frame time basis vector \gamma_0 serves to separate the energy and momentum like components of the tensor nicely into scalar and vector aspects. In particular for T(\gamma^0), one could write

\begin{aligned}\int T(\gamma^0) d^3 \mathbf{x} = (H + \mathbf{P}) \gamma_0,\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.13)

If these are correctly identified with energy and momentum then it also ought to be true that we have the conservation relationship

\begin{aligned}\frac{\partial {H}}{\partial {t}} + \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot (c \mathbf{P}) = 0.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.14)

However, multiplying out (3.12) yields for H

\begin{aligned}H &= \frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \int d^3 \mathbf{k} \left(\frac{1}{{c^2}} {\left\lvert{\dot{\mathbf{A}}}\right\rvert}^2 + \mathbf{k}^2 ({\left\lvert{\phi}\right\rvert}^2 + {\left\lvert{\mathbf{A}}\right\rvert}^2 )- {\left\lvert{\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}}\right\rvert}^2 + 2 \frac{\mathbf{k}}{c} \cdot \text{Real}( i {{\phi}}^{*} \dot{\mathbf{A}} )\right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.15)

The vector component takes a bit more work to reduce

\begin{aligned}\mathbf{P} &= \frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \int d^3 \mathbf{k} \text{Real} \left(\frac{i}{c} ({{\dot{\mathbf{A}}}}^{*} \cdot (\mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A})+ {{\phi}}^{*} \mathbf{k} \cdot (\mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A})+ \frac{i}{c} (\mathbf{k} \wedge {\mathbf{A}}^{*}) \cdot \dot{\mathbf{A}}- \phi (\mathbf{k} \wedge {\mathbf{A}}^{*}) \cdot \mathbf{k}\right) \\ &=\frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \int d^3 \mathbf{k} \text{Real} \left(\frac{i}{c} \left( ({{\dot{\mathbf{A}}}}^{*} \cdot \mathbf{k}) \mathbf{A} -({{\dot{\mathbf{A}}}}^{*} \cdot \mathbf{A}) \mathbf{k} \right)+ {{\phi}}^{*} \left( \mathbf{k}^2 \mathbf{A} - (\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}) \mathbf{k} \right)+ \frac{i}{c} \left( ({\mathbf{A}}^{*} \cdot \dot{\mathbf{A}}) \mathbf{k} - (\mathbf{k} \cdot \dot{\mathbf{A}}) {\mathbf{A}}^{*} \right)+ \phi \left( \mathbf{k}^2 {\mathbf{A}}^{*} -({\mathbf{A}}^{*} \cdot \mathbf{k}) \mathbf{k} \right) \right).\end{aligned}

Canceling and regrouping leaves

\begin{aligned}\mathbf{P}&=\epsilon_0 \int d^3 \mathbf{k} \text{Real} \left(\mathbf{A} \left( \mathbf{k}^2 {{\phi}}^{*} + \mathbf{k} \cdot {{\dot{\mathbf{A}}}}^{*} \right)+ \mathbf{k} \left( -{{\phi}}^{*} (\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}) + \frac{i}{c} ({\mathbf{A}}^{*} \cdot \dot{\mathbf{A}})\right)\right).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(3.16)

This has no explicit \mathbf{x} dependence, so the conservation relation (3.14) is violated unless {\partial {H}}/{\partial {t}} = 0. There is no reason to assume that will be the case. In the discrete Fourier series treatment, a gauge transformation allowed for elimination of \phi, and this implied \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} = 0 or \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} constant. We will probably have a similar result here, eliminating most of the terms in (3.15) and (3.16). Except for the constant \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} solution of the field equations there is no obvious way that such a simplified energy expression will have zero derivative.

A more reasonable conclusion is that this approach is flawed. We ought to be looking at the divergence relation as a starting point, and instead of integrating over all space, instead employing Gauss’s theorem to convert the divergence integral into a surface integral. Without math, the conservation relationship probably ought to be expressed as energy change in a volume is matched by the momentum change through the surface. However, without an integral over all space, we do not get the nice delta function cancellation observed above. How to proceed is not immediately clear. Stepping back to review applications of Gauss’s theorem is probably a good first step.

References

[1] Peeter Joot. Electrodynamic field energy for vacuum. [online]. http://sites.google.com/site/peeterjoot/math2009/fourierMaxVac.pdf.

[2] Peeter Joot. {Energy and momentum for Complex electric and magnetic field phasors.} [online]. http://sites.google.com/site/peeterjoot/math2009/complexFieldEnergy.pdf.

Posted in Math and Physics Learning. | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Ads by google. electrodynamic field energy for vacuum?

Posted by peeterjoot on December 21, 2009

Perhaps you have to study E&M to use this vacuum?

Posted in Incoherent ramblings | 1 Comment »

Electrodynamic field energy for vacuum (reworked)

Posted by peeterjoot on December 21, 2009

[Click here for a PDF of this post with nicer formatting]

Previous version.

This is a reworked version of a previous post ([also in PDF]

Reducing the products in the Dirac basis makes life more complicated then it needs to be (became obvious when attempting to derive an expression for the Poynting integral).

Motivation.

From Energy and momentum for Complex electric and magnetic field phasors [PDF] how to formulate the energy momentum tensor for complex vector fields (ie. phasors) in the Geometric Algebra formalism is now understood. To recap, for the field F = \mathbf{E} + I c \mathbf{B}, where \mathbf{E} and \mathbf{B} may be complex vectors we have for Maxwell’s equation

\begin{aligned}\nabla F = J/\epsilon_0 c.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(1)

This is a doubly complex representation, with the four vector pseudoscalar I = \gamma_0 \gamma_1 \gamma_2 \gamma_3 acting as a non-commutatitive imaginary, as well as real and imaginary parts for the electric and magnetic field vectors. We take the real part (not the scalar part) of any bivector solution F of Maxwell’s equation as the actual solution, but allow ourself the freedom to work with the complex phasor representation when convenient. In these phasor vectors, the imaginary i, as in \mathbf{E} = \text{Real}(\mathbf{E}) + i \text{Imag}(\mathbf{E}), is a commuting imaginary, commuting with all the multivector elements in the algebra.

The real valued, four vector, energy momentum tensor T(a) was found to be

\begin{aligned}T(a) = \frac{\epsilon_0}{4} \Bigl( {{F}}^{*} a \tilde{F} + \tilde{F} a {{F}}^{*} \Bigr) = -\frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \text{Real} \Bigl( {{F}}^{*} a F \Bigr).\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(2)

To supply some context that gives meaning to this tensor the associated conservation relationship was found to be

\begin{aligned}\nabla \cdot T(a) &= a \cdot \frac{1}{{ c }} \text{Real} \left( J \cdot {{F}}^{*} \right).\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(3)

and in particular for a = \gamma^0, this four vector divergence takes the form

\begin{aligned}\frac{\partial {}}{\partial {t}}\frac{\epsilon_0}{2}(\mathbf{E} \cdot {\mathbf{E}}^{*} + c^2 \mathbf{B} \cdot {\mathbf{B}}^{*})+ \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \frac{1}{{\mu_0}} \text{Real} (\mathbf{E} \times {\mathbf{B}}^{*} )+ \text{Real}( \mathbf{J} \cdot {\mathbf{E}}^{*} ) = 0,\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(4)

relating the energy term T^{00} = T(\gamma^0) \cdot \gamma^0 and the Poynting spatial vector T(\gamma^0) \wedge \gamma^0 with the current density and electric field product that constitutes the energy portion of the Lorentz force density.

Let’s apply this to calculating the energy associated with the field that is periodic within a rectangular prism as done by Bohm in [2]. We do not necessarily need the Geometric Algebra formalism for this calculation, but this will be a fun way to attempt it.

Setup

Let’s assume a Fourier representation for the four vector potential A for the field F = \nabla \wedge A. That is

\begin{aligned}A = \sum_{\mathbf{k}} A_\mathbf{k}(t) e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}},\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(5)

where summation is over all angular wave number triplets \mathbf{k} = 2 \pi (k_1/\lambda_1, k_2/\lambda_2, k_3/\lambda_3). The Fourier coefficients A_\mathbf{k} = {A_\mathbf{k}}^\mu \gamma_\mu are allowed to be complex valued, as is the resulting four vector A, and the associated bivector field F.

Fourier inversion, with V = \lambda_1 \lambda_2 \lambda_3, follows from

\begin{aligned}\delta_{\mathbf{k}', \mathbf{k}} =\frac{1}{{ V }}\int_0^{\lambda_1}\int_0^{\lambda_2}\int_0^{\lambda_3} e^{ i \mathbf{k}' \cdot \mathbf{x}} e^{-i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} dx^1 dx^2 dx^3,\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(6)

but only this orthogonality relationship and not the Fourier coefficients themselves

\begin{aligned}A_\mathbf{k} = \frac{1}{{ V }}\int_0^{\lambda_1}\int_0^{\lambda_2}\int_0^{\lambda_3} A(\mathbf{x}, t) e^{- i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} dx^1 dx^2 dx^3,\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(7)

will be of interest here. Evaluating the curl for this potential yields

\begin{aligned}F = \nabla \wedge A= \sum_{\mathbf{k}} \left( \frac{1}{{c}} \gamma^0 \wedge \dot{A}_\mathbf{k} + \gamma^m \wedge A_\mathbf{k} \frac{2 \pi i k_m}{\lambda_m} \right) e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}}.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(8)

Since the four vector potential has been expressed using an explicit split into time and space components it will be natural to re express the bivector field in terms of scalar and (spatial) vector potentials, with the Fourier coefficients. Writing \sigma_m = \gamma_m \gamma_0 for the spatial basis vectors, {A_\mathbf{k}}^0 = \phi_\mathbf{k}, and \mathbf{A} = A^k \sigma_k, this is

\begin{aligned}A_\mathbf{k} = (\phi_\mathbf{k} + \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}) \gamma_0.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(9)

The Faraday bivector field F is then

\begin{aligned}F = \sum_\mathbf{k} \left( -\frac{1}{{c}} \dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k} - i \mathbf{k} \phi_\mathbf{k} + i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \right) e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}}.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(10)

This is now enough to express the energy momentum tensor T(\gamma^\mu)

\begin{aligned}T(\gamma^\mu) &= -\frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \sum_{\mathbf{k},\mathbf{k}'}\text{Real} \left(\left( -\frac{1}{{c}} {{(\dot{\mathbf{A}}_{\mathbf{k}'})}}^{*} + i \mathbf{k}' {{\phi_{\mathbf{k}'}}}^{*} - i \mathbf{k}' \wedge {{\mathbf{A}_{\mathbf{k}'}}}^{*} \right) \gamma^\mu \left( -\frac{1}{{c}} \dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k} - i \mathbf{k} \phi_\mathbf{k} + i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \right) e^{i (\mathbf{k} -\mathbf{k}') \cdot \mathbf{x}}\right).\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(11)

It will be more convenient to work with a scalar plus bivector (spatial vector) form of this tensor, and right multiplication by \gamma_0 produces such a split

\begin{aligned}T(\gamma^\mu) \gamma_0 = \left\langle{{T(\gamma^\mu) \gamma_0}}\right\rangle + \sigma_a \left\langle{{ \sigma_a T(\gamma^\mu) \gamma_0 }}\right\rangle\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(12)

The primary object of this treatment will be consideration of the \mu = 0 components of the tensor, which provide a split into energy density T(\gamma^0) \cdot \gamma_0, and Poynting vector (momentum density) T(\gamma^0) \wedge \gamma_0.

Our first step is to integrate (12) over the volume V. This integration and the orthogonality relationship (6), removes the exponentials, leaving

\begin{aligned}\int T(\gamma^\mu) \cdot \gamma_0&= -\frac{\epsilon_0 V}{2} \sum_{\mathbf{k}}\text{Real} \left\langle{{\left( -\frac{1}{{c}} {{(\dot{\mathbf{A}}_{\mathbf{k}})}}^{*} + i \mathbf{k} {{\phi_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} - i \mathbf{k} \wedge {{\mathbf{A}_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} \right) \gamma^\mu \left( -\frac{1}{{c}} \dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k} - i \mathbf{k} \phi_\mathbf{k} + i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \right) \gamma_0 }}\right\rangle \\ \int T(\gamma^\mu) \wedge \gamma_0&= -\frac{\epsilon_0 V}{2} \sum_{\mathbf{k}}\text{Real} \sigma_a \left\langle{{ \sigma_a\left( -\frac{1}{{c}} {{(\dot{\mathbf{A}}_{\mathbf{k}})}}^{*} + i \mathbf{k} {{\phi_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} - i \mathbf{k} \wedge {{\mathbf{A}_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} \right) \gamma^\mu \left( -\frac{1}{{c}} \dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k} - i \mathbf{k} \phi_\mathbf{k} + i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \right) \gamma_0}}\right\rangle \end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(13)

Because \gamma_0 commutes with the spatial bivectors, and anticommutes with the spatial vectors, the remainder of the Dirac basis vectors in these expressions can be eliminated

\begin{aligned}\int T(\gamma^0) \cdot \gamma_0&= -\frac{\epsilon_0 V }{2} \sum_{\mathbf{k}}\text{Real} \left\langle{{\left( -\frac{1}{{c}} {{(\dot{\mathbf{A}}_{\mathbf{k}})}}^{*} + i \mathbf{k} {{\phi_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} - i \mathbf{k} \wedge {{\mathbf{A}_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} \right) \left( \frac{1}{{c}} \dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k} + i \mathbf{k} \phi_\mathbf{k} + i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \right) }}\right\rangle \end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(15)

\begin{aligned}\int T(\gamma^0) \wedge \gamma_0&= -\frac{\epsilon_0 V}{2} \sum_{\mathbf{k}}\text{Real} \sigma_a \left\langle{{ \sigma_a\left( -\frac{1}{{c}} {{(\dot{\mathbf{A}}_{\mathbf{k}})}}^{*} + i \mathbf{k} {{\phi_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} - i \mathbf{k} \wedge {{\mathbf{A}_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} \right) \left( \frac{1}{{c}} \dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k} + i \mathbf{k} \phi_\mathbf{k} + i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \right) }}\right\rangle \end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(16)

\begin{aligned}\int T(\gamma^m) \cdot \gamma_0&= \frac{\epsilon_0 V }{2} \sum_{\mathbf{k}}\text{Real} \left\langle{{\left( -\frac{1}{{c}} {{(\dot{\mathbf{A}}_{\mathbf{k}})}}^{*} + i \mathbf{k} {{\phi_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} - i \mathbf{k} \wedge {{\mathbf{A}_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} \right) \sigma_m\left( \frac{1}{{c}} \dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k} + i \mathbf{k} \phi_\mathbf{k} + i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \right) }}\right\rangle \end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(17)

\begin{aligned}\int T(\gamma^m) \wedge \gamma_0&= \frac{\epsilon_0 V}{2} \sum_{\mathbf{k}}\text{Real} \sigma_a \left\langle{{ \sigma_a\left( -\frac{1}{{c}} {{(\dot{\mathbf{A}}_{\mathbf{k}})}}^{*} + i \mathbf{k} {{\phi_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} - i \mathbf{k} \wedge {{\mathbf{A}_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} \right) \sigma_m\left( \frac{1}{{c}} \dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k} + i \mathbf{k} \phi_\mathbf{k} + i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \right) }}\right\rangle.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(18)

Expanding the energy momentum tensor components.

Energy

In (15) only the bivector-bivector and vector-vector products produce any scalar grades. Except for the bivector product this can be done by inspection. For that part we utilize the identity

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{ (\mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{a}) (\mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{b}) }}\right\rangle= (\mathbf{a} \cdot \mathbf{k}) (\mathbf{b} \cdot \mathbf{k}) - \mathbf{k}^2 (\mathbf{a} \cdot \mathbf{b}).\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(19)

This leaves for the energy H = \int T(\gamma^0) \cdot \gamma_0 in the volume

\begin{aligned}H = \frac{\epsilon_0 V}{2} \sum_\mathbf{k} \left(\frac{1}{{c^2}} {\left\lvert{\dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2 +\mathbf{k}^2 \left( {\left\lvert{\phi_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2 + {\left\lvert{\mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2 \right) - {\left\lvert{\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2+ \frac{2}{c} \text{Real} \left( i {{\phi_\mathbf{k}}}^{*} \cdot \dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k} \right)\right)\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(20)

We are left with a completely real expression, and one without any explicit Geometric Algebra. This does not look like the Harmonic oscillator Hamiltonian that was expected. A gauge transformation to eliminate \phi_\mathbf{k} and an observation about when \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} equals zero will give us that, but first lets get the mechanical jobs done, and reduce the products for the field momentum.

Momentum

Now move on to (16). For the factors other than \sigma_a only the vector-bivector products can contribute to the scalar product. We have two such products, one of the form

\begin{aligned}\sigma_a \left\langle{{ \sigma_a \mathbf{a} (\mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{c}) }}\right\rangle&=\sigma_a (\mathbf{c} \cdot \sigma_a) (\mathbf{a} \cdot \mathbf{k}) - \sigma_a (\mathbf{k} \cdot \sigma_a) (\mathbf{a} \cdot \mathbf{c}) \\ &=\mathbf{c} (\mathbf{a} \cdot \mathbf{k}) - \mathbf{k} (\mathbf{a} \cdot \mathbf{c}),\end{aligned}

and the other

\begin{aligned}\sigma_a \left\langle{{ \sigma_a (\mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{c}) \mathbf{a} }}\right\rangle&=\sigma_a (\mathbf{k} \cdot \sigma_a) (\mathbf{a} \cdot \mathbf{c}) - \sigma_a (\mathbf{c} \cdot \sigma_a) (\mathbf{a} \cdot \mathbf{k}) \\ &=\mathbf{k} (\mathbf{a} \cdot \mathbf{c}) - \mathbf{c} (\mathbf{a} \cdot \mathbf{k}).\end{aligned}

The momentum \mathbf{P} = \int T(\gamma^0) \wedge \gamma_0 in this volume follows by computation of

\begin{aligned}&\sigma_a \left\langle{{ \sigma_a\left( -\frac{1}{{c}} {{(\dot{\mathbf{A}}_{\mathbf{k}})}}^{*} + i \mathbf{k} {{\phi_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} - i \mathbf{k} \wedge {{\mathbf{A}_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} \right) \left( \frac{1}{{c}} \dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k} + i \mathbf{k} \phi_\mathbf{k} + i \mathbf{k} \wedge \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \right) }}\right\rangle \\ &=  i \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \left( \left( -\frac{1}{{c}} {{(\dot{\mathbf{A}}_{\mathbf{k}})}}^{*} + i \mathbf{k} {{\phi_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} \right) \cdot \mathbf{k} \right)  - i \mathbf{k} \left( \left( -\frac{1}{{c}} {{(\dot{\mathbf{A}}_{\mathbf{k}})}}^{*} + i \mathbf{k} {{\phi_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} \right) \cdot \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \right)  \\ &- i \mathbf{k} \left( \left( \frac{1}{{c}} \dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k} + i \mathbf{k} \phi_\mathbf{k} \right) \cdot {{\mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}}^{*} \right)  + i {{\mathbf{A}_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} \left( \left( \frac{1}{{c}} \dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k} + i \mathbf{k} \phi_\mathbf{k} \right) \cdot \mathbf{k} \right)\end{aligned}

All the products are paired in nice conjugates, taking real parts, and premultiplication with -\epsilon_0 V/2 gives the desired result. Observe that two of these terms cancel, and another two have no real part. Those last are

\begin{aligned}-\frac{\epsilon_0 V \mathbf{k}}{2 c} \text{Real} \left( i {{(\dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k}}}^{*} \cdot \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}+\dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k} \cdot {{\mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}}^{*} \right)&=-\frac{\epsilon_0 V \mathbf{k}}{2 c} \text{Real} \left( i \frac{d}{dt} \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \cdot {{\mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}}^{*} \right)\end{aligned}

Taking the real part of this pure imaginary i {\left\lvert{\mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2 is zero, leaving just

\begin{aligned}\mathbf{P} &= \epsilon_0 V \sum_{\mathbf{k}}\text{Real} \left(i \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \left( \frac{1}{{c}} {{\dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k}}}^{*} \cdot \mathbf{k} \right)+ \mathbf{k}^2 \phi_\mathbf{k} {{ \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} }}^{*}- \mathbf{k} {{\phi_\mathbf{k}}}^{*} (\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k})\right)\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(21)

I am not sure why exactly, but I actually expected a term with {\left\lvert{\mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2, quadratic in the vector potential. Is there a mistake above?

Gauge transformation to simplify the Hamiltonian.

In (20) something that looked like the Harmonic oscillator was expected. On the surface this does not appear to be such a beast. Exploitation of gauge freedom is required to make the simplification that puts things into the Harmonic oscillator form.

If we are to change our four vector potential A \rightarrow A + \nabla \psi, then Maxwell’s equation takes the form

\begin{aligned}J/\epsilon_0 c = \nabla (\nabla \wedge (A + \nabla \psi) = \nabla (\nabla \wedge A) + \nabla (\underbrace{\nabla \wedge \nabla \psi}_{=0}),\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(22)

which is unchanged by the addition of the gradient to any original potential solution to the equation. In coordinates this is a transformation of the form

\begin{aligned}A^\mu \rightarrow A^\mu + \partial_\mu \psi,\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(23)

and we can use this to force any one of the potential coordinates to zero. For this problem, it appears that it is desirable to seek a \psi such that A^0 + \partial_0 \psi = 0. That is

\begin{aligned}\sum_\mathbf{k} \phi_\mathbf{k}(t) e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} + \frac{1}{{c}} \partial_t \psi = 0.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(24)

Or,

\begin{aligned}\psi(\mathbf{x},t) = \psi(\mathbf{x},0) -\frac{1}{{c}} \sum_\mathbf{k} e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} \int_{\tau=0}^t \phi_\mathbf{k}(\tau).\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(25)

With such a transformation, the \phi_\mathbf{k} and \dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k} cross term in the Hamiltonian (20) vanishes, as does the \phi_\mathbf{k} term in the four vector square of the last term, leaving just

\begin{aligned}H = \frac{\epsilon_0}{c^2} V \sum_\mathbf{k}\left(\frac{1}{{2}} {\left\lvert{\dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2+\frac{1}{{2}} \Bigl((c \mathbf{k})^2 {\left\lvert{\mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2 + {\left\lvert{ ( c \mathbf{k}) \cdot \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2+ {\left\lvert{ c \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2\Bigr)\right).\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(26)

Additionally, wedging (5) with \gamma_0 now does not loose any information so our potential Fourier series is reduced to just

\begin{aligned}\mathbf{A} &= \sum_{\mathbf{k}} \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}(t) e^{2 \pi i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} \\ \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} &= \frac{1}{{ V }}\int_0^{\lambda_1}\int_0^{\lambda_2}\int_0^{\lambda_3} \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{x}, t) e^{-i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} dx^1 dx^2 dx^3.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(27)

The desired harmonic oscillator form would be had in (26) if it were not for the \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} term. Does that vanish? Returning to Maxwell’s equation should answer that question, but first it has to be expressed in terms of the vector potential. While \mathbf{A} = A \wedge \gamma_0, the lack of an A^0 component means that this can be inverted as

\begin{aligned}A = \mathbf{A} \gamma_0 = -\gamma_0 \mathbf{A}.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(29)

The gradient can also be factored scalar and spatial vector components

\begin{aligned}\nabla = \gamma^0 ( \partial_0 + \boldsymbol{\nabla} ) = ( \partial_0 - \boldsymbol{\nabla} ) \gamma^0.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(30)

So, with this A^0 = 0 gauge choice the bivector field F is

\begin{aligned}F = \nabla \wedge A = \frac{1}{{2}} \left( \stackrel{ \rightarrow }{\nabla} A - A \stackrel{ \leftarrow }{\nabla} \right) \end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(31)

From the left the gradient action on A is

\begin{aligned}\stackrel{ \rightarrow }{\nabla} A &= ( \partial_0 - \boldsymbol{\nabla} ) \gamma^0 (-\gamma_0 \mathbf{A}) \\ &= ( -\partial_0 + \stackrel{ \rightarrow }{\boldsymbol{\nabla}} ) \mathbf{A},\end{aligned}

and from the right

\begin{aligned}A \stackrel{ \leftarrow }{\nabla}&= \mathbf{A} \gamma_0 \gamma^0 ( \partial_0 + \boldsymbol{\nabla} ) \\ &= \mathbf{A} ( \partial_0 + \boldsymbol{\nabla} ) \\ &= \partial_0 \mathbf{A} + \mathbf{A} \stackrel{ \leftarrow }{\boldsymbol{\nabla}} \end{aligned}

Taking the difference we have

\begin{aligned}F &= \frac{1}{{2}} \Bigl( -\partial_0 \mathbf{A} + \stackrel{ \rightarrow }{\boldsymbol{\nabla}} \mathbf{A} -  \partial_0 \mathbf{A} - \mathbf{A} \stackrel{ \leftarrow }{\boldsymbol{\nabla}} \Bigr).\end{aligned}

Which is just

\begin{aligned}F = -\partial_0 \mathbf{A} + \boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A}.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(32)

For this vacuum case, premultiplication of Maxwell’s equation by \gamma_0 gives

\begin{aligned}0 &= \gamma_0 \nabla ( -\partial_0 \mathbf{A} + \boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A} ) \\ &= (\partial_0 + \boldsymbol{\nabla})( -\partial_0 \mathbf{A} + \boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A} ) \\ &= -\frac{1}{{c^2}} \partial_{tt} \mathbf{A} - \partial_0 \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A} - \partial_0 \boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A} + \partial_0 ( \boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A} ) + \underbrace{\boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot ( \boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A} ) }_{\boldsymbol{\nabla}^2 \mathbf{A} - \boldsymbol{\nabla} (\boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A})}+ \underbrace{\boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge ( \boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A} )}_{=0} \\ \end{aligned}

The spatial bivector and trivector grades are all zero. Equating the remaining scalar and vector components to zero separately yields a pair of equations in \mathbf{A}

\begin{aligned}0 &= \partial_t (\boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A}) \\ 0 &= -\frac{1}{{c^2}} \partial_{tt} \mathbf{A} + \boldsymbol{\nabla}^2 \mathbf{A} + \boldsymbol{\nabla} (\boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A}) \end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(33)

If the divergence of the vector potential is constant we have just a wave equation. Let’s see what that divergence is with the assumed Fourier representation

\begin{aligned}\boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A} &=\sum_{\mathbf{k} \ne (0,0,0)} {\mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}^m 2 \pi i \frac{k_m}{\lambda_m} e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} \\ &=i \sum_{\mathbf{k} \ne (0,0,0)} (\mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{k}) e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} \\ &=i \sum_\mathbf{k} (\mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{k}) e^{i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} \end{aligned}

Since \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} = \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}(t), there are two ways for \partial_t (\boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A}) = 0. For each \mathbf{k} there must be a requirement for either \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{k} = 0 or \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} = \text{constant}. The constant \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} solution to the first equation appears to represent a standing spatial wave with no time dependence. Is that of any interest?

The more interesting seeming case is where we have some non-static time varying state. In this case, if \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{k}, the second of these Maxwell’s equations is just the vector potential wave equation, since the divergence is zero. That is

\begin{aligned}0 &= -\frac{1}{{c^2}} \partial_{tt} \mathbf{A} + \boldsymbol{\nabla}^2 \mathbf{A} \end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(35)

Solving this isn’t really what is of interest, since the objective was just to determine if the divergence could be assumed to be zero. This shows then, that if the transverse solution to Maxwell’s equation is picked, the Hamiltonian for this field, with this gauge choice, becomes

\begin{aligned}H = \frac{\epsilon_0}{c^2} V \sum_\mathbf{k}\left(\frac{1}{{2}} {\left\lvert{\dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2+\frac{1}{{2}} (c \mathbf{k})^2 {\left\lvert{\mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2 \right).\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(36)

How does the gauge choice alter the Poynting vector? From (21), all the \phi_\mathbf{k} dependence in that integrated momentum density is lost

\begin{aligned}\mathbf{P} &= \epsilon_0 V \sum_{\mathbf{k}}\text{Real} \left(i \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \left( \frac{1}{{c}} {{\dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k}}}^{*} \cdot \mathbf{k} \right)\right).\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(37)

The \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{k} solutions to Maxwell’s equation are seen to result in zero momentum for this infinite periodic field. My expectation was something of the form c \mathbf{P} = H \hat{\mathbf{k}}, so intuition is either failing me, or my math is failing me, or this contrived periodic field solution leads to trouble.

Conclusions and followup.

The objective was met, a reproduction of Bohm’s Harmonic oscillator result using a complex exponential Fourier series instead of separate sine and cosines.

The reason for Bohm’s choice to fix zero divergence as the gauge choice upfront is now clear. That automatically cuts complexity from the results. Figuring out how to work this problem with complex valued potentials and also using the Geometric Algebra formulation probably also made the work a bit more difficult since blundering through both simultaneously was required instead of just one at a time.

This was an interesting exercise though, since doing it this way I am able to understand all the intermediate steps. Bohm employed some subtler argumentation to eliminate the scalar potential \phi upfront, and I have to admit I did not follow his logic, whereas blindly following where the math leads me all makes sense.

As a bit of followup, I’d like to consider the constant \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} case in more detail, and any implications of the freedom to pick \mathbf{A}_0.

The general calculation of T^{\mu\nu} for the assumed Fourier solution should be possible too, but was not attempted. Doing that general calculation with a four dimensional Fourier series is likely tidier than working with scalar and spatial variables as done here.

Now that the math is out of the way (except possibly for the momentum which doesn’t seem right), some discussion of implications and applications is also in order. My preference is to let the math sink-in a bit first and mull over the momentum issues at leisure.

References

[2] D. Bohm. Quantum Theory. Courier Dover Publications, 1989.

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Electrodynamic field energy for vacuum.

Posted by peeterjoot on December 19, 2009

[Click here for a PDF of this post with nicer formatting]

Motivation.

We now know how to formulate the energy momentum tensor for complex vector fields (ie. phasors) in the Geometric Algebra formalism. To recap, for the field F = \mathbf{E} + I c \mathbf{B}, where \mathbf{E} and \mathbf{B} may be complex vectors we have for Maxwell’s equation

\begin{aligned}\nabla F = J/\epsilon_0 c.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(1)

This is a doubly complex representation, with the four vector pseudoscalar I = \gamma_0 \gamma_1 \gamma_2 \gamma_3 acting as a non-commutatitive imaginary, as well as real and imaginary parts for the electric and magnetic field vectors. We take the real part (not the scalar part) of any bivector solution F of Maxwell’s equation as the actual solution, but allow ourself the freedom to work with the complex phasor representation when convenient. In these phasor vectors, the imaginary i, as in \mathbf{E} = \text{Real}(\mathbf{E}) + i \text{Imag}(\mathbf{E}), is a commuting imaginary, commuting with all the multivector elements in the algebra.

The real valued, four vector, energy momentum tensor T(a) was found to be

\begin{aligned}T(a) = \frac{\epsilon_0}{4} \Bigl( {{F}}^{*} a \tilde{F} + \tilde{F} a {{F}}^{*} \Bigr) = -\frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \text{Real} \Bigl( {{F}}^{*} a F \Bigr).\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(2)

To supply some context that gives meaning to this tensor the associated conservation relationship was found to be

\begin{aligned}\nabla \cdot T(a) &= a \cdot \frac{1}{{ c }} \text{Real} \left( J \cdot {{F}}^{*} \right).\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(3)

and in particular for a = \gamma^0, this four vector divergence takes the form

\begin{aligned}\frac{\partial {}}{\partial {t}}\frac{\epsilon_0}{2}(\mathbf{E} \cdot {\mathbf{E}}^{*} + c^2 \mathbf{B} \cdot {\mathbf{B}}^{*})+ \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \frac{1}{{\mu_0}} \text{Real} (\mathbf{E} \times {\mathbf{B}}^{*} )+ \text{Real}( \mathbf{J} \cdot {\mathbf{E}}^{*} ) = 0,\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(4)

relating the energy term T^{00} = T(\gamma^0) \cdot \gamma^0 and the Poynting spatial vector T(\gamma^0) \wedge \gamma^0 with the current density and electric field product that constitutes the energy portion of the Lorentz force density.

Let’s apply this to calculating the energy associated with the field that is periodic within a rectangular prism as done by Bohm in [1]. We do not necessarily need the Geometric Algebra formalism for this calculation, but this will be a fun way to attempt it.

Setup

Let’s assume a Fourier representation for the four vector potential A for the field F = \nabla \wedge A. That is

\begin{aligned}A = \sum_{\mathbf{k}} A_\mathbf{k}(t) e^{2 \pi i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}},\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(5)

where summation is over all wave number triplets \mathbf{k} = (p/\lambda_1,q/\lambda_2,r/\lambda_3). The Fourier coefficients A_\mathbf{k} = {A_\mathbf{k}}^\mu \gamma_\mu are allowed to be complex valued, as is the resulting four vector A, and the associated bivector field F.

Fourier inversion follows from

\begin{aligned}\delta_{\mathbf{k}', \mathbf{k}} =\frac{1}{{ \lambda_1 \lambda_2 \lambda_3 }}\int_0^{\lambda_1}\int_0^{\lambda_2}\int_0^{\lambda_3} e^{2 \pi i \mathbf{k}' \cdot \mathbf{x}} e^{-2 \pi i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} dx^1 dx^2 dx^3,\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(6)

but only this orthogonality relationship and not the Fourier coefficients themselves

\begin{aligned}A_\mathbf{k} = \frac{1}{{ \lambda_1 \lambda_2 \lambda_3 }}\int_0^{\lambda_1}\int_0^{\lambda_2}\int_0^{\lambda_3} A(\mathbf{x}, t) e^{-2 \pi i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} dx^1 dx^2 dx^3,\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(7)

will be of interest here. Evaluating the curl for this potential yields

\begin{aligned}F = \nabla \wedge A= \sum_{\mathbf{k}} \left( \frac{1}{{c}} \gamma^0 \wedge \dot{A}_\mathbf{k} + \sum_{m=1}^3 \gamma^m \wedge A_\mathbf{k} \frac{2 \pi i k_m}{\lambda_m} \right) e^{2 \pi i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}}.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(8)

We can now form the energy density

\begin{aligned}U = T(\gamma^0) \cdot \gamma^0=-\frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \text{Real} \Bigl( {{F}}^{*} \gamma^0 F \gamma^0 \Bigr).\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(9)

With implied summation over all repeated integer indexes (even without matching uppers and lowers), this is

\begin{aligned}U =-\frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \sum_{\mathbf{k}', \mathbf{k}} \text{Real} \left\langle{{\left( \frac{1}{{c}} \gamma^0 \wedge {{\dot{A}_{\mathbf{k}'}}}^{*} - \gamma^m \wedge {{A_{\mathbf{k}'}}}^{*} \frac{2 \pi i k_m'}{\lambda_m} \right) e^{-2 \pi i \mathbf{k}' \cdot \mathbf{x}}\gamma^0\left( \frac{1}{{c}} \gamma^0 \wedge \dot{A}_\mathbf{k} + \gamma^n \wedge A_\mathbf{k} \frac{2 \pi i k_n}{\lambda_n} \right) e^{2 \pi i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}}\gamma^0}}\right\rangle.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(10)

The grade selection used here doesn’t change the result since we already have a scalar, but will just make it convenient to filter out any higher order products that will cancel anyways. Integrating over the volume element and taking advantage of the orthogonality relationship (6), the exponentials are removed, leaving the energy contained in the volume

\begin{aligned}H = -\frac{\epsilon_0 \lambda_1 \lambda_2 \lambda_3}{2}\sum_{\mathbf{k}} \text{Real} \left\langle{{\left( \frac{1}{{c}} \gamma^0 \wedge {{\dot{A}_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} - \gamma^m \wedge {{A_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} \frac{2 \pi i k_m}{\lambda_m} \right) \gamma^0\left( \frac{1}{{c}} \gamma^0 \wedge \dot{A}_\mathbf{k} + \gamma^n \wedge A_\mathbf{k} \frac{2 \pi i k_n}{\lambda_n} \right) \gamma^0}}\right\rangle.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(11)

First reduction of the Hamiltonian.

Let’s take the products involved in sequence one at a time, and evaluate, later adding and taking real parts if required all of

\begin{aligned}\frac{1}{{c^2}}\left\langle{{ (\gamma^0 \wedge {{\dot{A}_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} ) \gamma^0 (\gamma^0 \wedge \dot{A}_\mathbf{k}) \gamma^0 }}\right\rangle &=-\frac{1}{{c^2}}\left\langle{{ (\gamma^0 \wedge {{\dot{A}_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} ) (\gamma^0 \wedge \dot{A}_\mathbf{k}) }}\right\rangle \end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(12)

\begin{aligned}- \frac{2 \pi i k_m}{c \lambda_m} \left\langle{{ (\gamma^m \wedge {{A_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} ) \gamma^0 ( \gamma^0 \wedge \dot{A}_\mathbf{k} ) \gamma^0}}\right\rangle &=\frac{2 \pi i k_m}{c \lambda_m} \left\langle{{ (\gamma^m \wedge {{A_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} ) ( \gamma^0 \wedge \dot{A}_\mathbf{k} ) }}\right\rangle \end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(13)

\begin{aligned}\frac{2 \pi i k_n}{c \lambda_n} \left\langle{{ ( \gamma^0 \wedge {{\dot{A}_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} ) \gamma^0 ( \gamma^n \wedge A_\mathbf{k} ) \gamma^0}}\right\rangle &=-\frac{2 \pi i k_n}{c \lambda_n} \left\langle{{ ( \gamma^0 \wedge {{\dot{A}_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} ) ( \gamma^n \wedge A_\mathbf{k} ) }}\right\rangle \end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(14)

\begin{aligned}-\frac{4 \pi^2 k_m k_n}{\lambda_m \lambda_n}\left\langle{{ (\gamma^m \wedge {{A_{\mathbf{k}}}}^{*} ) \gamma^0(\gamma^n \wedge A_\mathbf{k} ) \gamma^0}}\right\rangle. &\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(15)

The expectation is to obtain a Hamiltonian for the field that has the structure of harmonic oscillators, where the middle two products would have to be zero or sum to zero or have real parts that sum to zero. The first is expected to contain only products of {\left\lvert{{\dot{A}_\mathbf{k}}^m}\right\rvert}^2, and the last only products of {\left\lvert{{A_\mathbf{k}}^m}\right\rvert}^2.

While initially guessing that (13) and (14) may cancel, this isn’t so obviously the case. The use of cyclic permutation of multivectors within the scalar grade selection operator \left\langle{{A B}}\right\rangle = \left\langle{{B A}}\right\rangle plus a change of dummy summation indexes in one of the two shows that this sum is of the form Z + {{Z}}^{*}. This sum is intrinsically real, so we can neglect one of the two doubling the other, but we will still be required to show that the real part of either is zero.

Lets reduce these one at a time starting with (12), and write \dot{A}_\mathbf{k} = \kappa temporarily

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{ (\gamma^0 \wedge {{\kappa}}^{*} ) (\gamma^0 \wedge \kappa }}\right\rangle &={\kappa^m}^{{*}} \kappa^{m'}\left\langle{{ \gamma^0 \gamma_m \gamma^0 \gamma_{m'} }}\right\rangle \\ &=-{\kappa^m}^{{*}} \kappa^{m'}\left\langle{{ \gamma_m \gamma_{m'} }}\right\rangle  \\ &={\kappa^m}^{{*}} \kappa^{m'}\delta_{m m'}.\end{aligned}

So the first of our Hamiltonian terms is

\begin{aligned}\frac{\epsilon_0 \lambda_1 \lambda_2 \lambda_3}{2 c^2}\left\langle{{ (\gamma^0 \wedge {{\dot{A}_\mathbf{k}}}^{*} ) (\gamma^0 \wedge \dot{A}_\mathbf{k} }}\right\rangle &=\frac{\epsilon_0 \lambda_1 \lambda_2 \lambda_3}{2 c^2}{\left\lvert{{{\dot{A}}_{\mathbf{k}}}^m}\right\rvert}^2.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(16)

Note that summation over m is still implied here, so we’d be better off with a spatial vector representation of the Fourier coefficients \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} = A_\mathbf{k} \wedge \gamma_0. With such a notation, this contribution to the Hamiltonian is

\begin{aligned}\frac{\epsilon_0 \lambda_1 \lambda_2 \lambda_3}{2 c^2} \dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k} \cdot {{\dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k}}}^{*}.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(17)

To reduce (13) and (13), this time writing \kappa = A_\mathbf{k}, we can start with just the scalar selection

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{ (\gamma^m \wedge {{\kappa}}^{*} ) ( \gamma^0 \wedge \dot{\kappa} ) }}\right\rangle &=\Bigl( \gamma^m {{(\kappa^0)}}^{*} - {{\kappa}}^{*} \underbrace{(\gamma^m \cdot \gamma^0)}_{=0} \Bigr) \cdot \dot{\kappa} \\ &={{(\kappa^0)}}^{*} \dot{\kappa}^m\end{aligned}

Thus the contribution to the Hamiltonian from (13) and (13) is

\begin{aligned}\frac{2 \epsilon_0 \lambda_1 \lambda_2 \lambda_3 \pi k_m}{c \lambda_m} \text{Real} \Bigl( i {{(A_\mathbf{k}^0)}}^{*} \dot{A_\mathbf{k}}^m \Bigl)=\frac{2 \pi \epsilon_0 \lambda_1 \lambda_2 \lambda_3}{c} \text{Real} \Bigl( i {{(A_\mathbf{k}^0)}}^{*} \mathbf{k} \cdot \dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k} \Bigl).\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(18)

Most definitively not zero in general. Our final expansion (15) is the messiest. Again with A_\mathbf{k} = \kappa for short, the grade selection of this term in coordinates is

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{ (\gamma^m \wedge {{\kappa}}^{*} ) \gamma^0 (\gamma^n \wedge \kappa ) \gamma^0 }}\right\rangle&=- {{\kappa_\mu}}^{*} \kappa^\nu   \left\langle{{ (\gamma^m \wedge \gamma^\mu) \gamma^0 (\gamma_n \wedge \gamma_\nu) \gamma^0 }}\right\rangle\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(19)

Expanding this out yields

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{ (\gamma^m \wedge {{\kappa}}^{*} ) \gamma^0 (\gamma^n \wedge \kappa ) \gamma^0 }}\right\rangle&=- ( {\left\lvert{\kappa_0}\right\rvert}^2 - {\left\lvert{A^a}\right\rvert}^2 ) \delta_{m n} + {{A^n}}^{*} A^m.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(20)

The contribution to the Hamiltonian from this, with \phi_\mathbf{k} = A^0_\mathbf{k}, is then

\begin{aligned}2 \pi^2 \epsilon_0 \lambda_1 \lambda_2 \lambda_3 \Bigl(-\mathbf{k}^2 {{\phi_\mathbf{k}}}^{*} \phi_\mathbf{k} + \mathbf{k}^2 ({{\mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}}^{*} \cdot \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k})+ (\mathbf{k} \cdot {{\mathbf{A}_k}}^{*}) (\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}_k)\Bigr).\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(21)

A final reassembly of the Hamiltonian from the parts (17) and (18) and (21) is then

\begin{aligned}H = \epsilon_0 \lambda_1 \lambda_2 \lambda_3 \sum_\mathbf{k}\left(\frac{1}{{2 c^2}} {\left\lvert{\dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2+\frac{2 \pi}{c} \text{Real} \Bigl( i {{ \phi_\mathbf{k} }}^{*} (\mathbf{k} \cdot \dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k}) \Bigl)+2 \pi^2 \Bigl(\mathbf{k}^2 ( -{\left\lvert{\phi_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2 + {\left\lvert{\mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2 ) + {\left\lvert{\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2\Bigr)\right).\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(22)

This is finally reduced to a completely real expression, and one without any explicit Geometric Algebra. All the four vector Fourier vector potentials written out explicitly in terms of the spacetime split A_\mathbf{k} = (\phi_\mathbf{k}, \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}), which is natural since an explicit time and space split was the starting point.

Gauge transformation to simplify the Hamiltonian.

While (22) has considerably simpler form than (11), what was expected, was something that looked like the Harmonic oscillator. On the surface this does not appear to be such a beast. Exploitation of gauge freedom is required to make the simplification that puts things into the Harmonic oscillator form.

If we are to change our four vector potential A \rightarrow A + \nabla \psi, then Maxwell’s equation takes the form

\begin{aligned}J/\epsilon_0 c = \nabla (\nabla \wedge (A + \nabla \psi) = \nabla (\nabla \wedge A) + \nabla (\underbrace{\nabla \wedge \nabla \psi}_{=0}),\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(23)

which is unchanged by the addition of the gradient to any original potential solution to the equation. In coordinates this is a transformation of the form

\begin{aligned}A^\mu \rightarrow A^\mu + \partial_\mu \psi,\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(24)

and we can use this to force any one of the potential coordinates to zero. For this problem, it appears that it is desirable to seek a \psi such that A^0 + \partial_0 \psi = 0. That is

\begin{aligned}\sum_\mathbf{k} \phi_\mathbf{k}(t) e^{2 \pi i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} + \frac{1}{{c}} \partial_t \psi = 0.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(25)

Or,

\begin{aligned}\psi(\mathbf{x},t) = \psi(\mathbf{x},0) -\frac{1}{{c}} \sum_\mathbf{k} e^{2 \pi i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} \int_{\tau=0}^t \phi_\mathbf{k}(\tau).\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(26)

With such a transformation, the \phi_\mathbf{k} and \dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k} cross term in the Hamiltonian (22) vanishes, as does the \phi_\mathbf{k} term in the four vector square of the last term, leaving just

\begin{aligned}H = \frac{\epsilon_0}{c^2} \lambda_1 \lambda_2 \lambda_3 \sum_\mathbf{k}\left(\frac{1}{{2}} {\left\lvert{\dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2+\frac{1}{{2}} \Bigl((2 \pi c \mathbf{k})^2 {\left\lvert{\mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2 + {\left\lvert{ ( 2 \pi c \mathbf{k}) \cdot \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2\Bigr)\right).\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(27)

Additionally, wedging (5) with \gamma_0 now does not loose any information so our potential Fourier series is reduced to just

\begin{aligned}\mathbf{A} &= \sum_{\mathbf{k}} \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}(t) e^{2 \pi i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} \\ \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} &= \frac{1}{{ \lambda_1 \lambda_2 \lambda_3 }}\int_0^{\lambda_1}\int_0^{\lambda_2}\int_0^{\lambda_3} \mathbf{A}(\mathbf{x}, t) e^{-2 \pi i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} dx^1 dx^2 dx^3.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(28)

The desired harmonic oscillator form would be had in (27) if it were not for the \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} term. Does that vanish? Returning to Maxwell’s equation should answer that question, but first it has to be expressed in terms of the vector potential. While \mathbf{A} = A \wedge \gamma_0, the lack of an A^0 component means that this can be inverted as

\begin{aligned}A = \mathbf{A} \gamma_0 = -\gamma_0 \mathbf{A}.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(30)

The gradient can also be factored scalar and spatial vector components

\begin{aligned}\nabla = \gamma^0 ( \partial_0 + \boldsymbol{\nabla} ) = ( \partial_0 - \boldsymbol{\nabla} ) \gamma^0.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(31)

So, with this A^0 = 0 gauge choice the bivector field F is

\begin{aligned}F = \nabla \wedge A = \frac{1}{{2}} \left( \stackrel{ \rightarrow }{\nabla} A - A \stackrel{ \leftarrow }{\nabla} \right) \end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(32)

From the left the gradient action on A is

\begin{aligned}\stackrel{ \rightarrow }{\nabla} A &= ( \partial_0 - \boldsymbol{\nabla} ) \gamma^0 (-\gamma_0 \mathbf{A}) \\ &= ( -\partial_0 + \stackrel{ \rightarrow }{\boldsymbol{\nabla}} ) \mathbf{A},\end{aligned}

and from the right

\begin{aligned}A \stackrel{ \leftarrow }{\nabla}&= \mathbf{A} \gamma_0 \gamma^0 ( \partial_0 + \boldsymbol{\nabla} ) \\ &= \mathbf{A} ( \partial_0 + \boldsymbol{\nabla} ) \\ &= \partial_0 \mathbf{A} + \mathbf{A} \stackrel{ \leftarrow }{\boldsymbol{\nabla}} \end{aligned}

Taking the difference we have

\begin{aligned}F &= \frac{1}{{2}} \Bigl( -\partial_0 \mathbf{A} + \stackrel{ \rightarrow }{\boldsymbol{\nabla}} \mathbf{A} -  \partial_0 \mathbf{A} - \mathbf{A} \stackrel{ \leftarrow }{\boldsymbol{\nabla}} \Bigr).\end{aligned}

Which is just

\begin{aligned}F = -\partial_0 \mathbf{A} + \boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A}.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(33)

For this vacuum case, premultiplication of Maxwell’s equation by \gamma_0 gives

\begin{aligned}0 &= \gamma_0 \nabla ( -\partial_0 \mathbf{A} + \boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A} ) \\ &= (\partial_0 + \boldsymbol{\nabla})( -\partial_0 \mathbf{A} + \boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A} ) \\ &= -\frac{1}{{c^2}} \partial_{tt} \mathbf{A} - \partial_0 \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A} - \partial_0 \boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A} + \partial_0 ( \boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A} ) + \underbrace{\boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot ( \boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A} ) }_{\boldsymbol{\nabla}^2 \mathbf{A} - \boldsymbol{\nabla} (\boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A})}+ \underbrace{\boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge ( \boldsymbol{\nabla} \wedge \mathbf{A} )}_{=0} \\ \end{aligned}

The spatial bivector and trivector grades are all zero. Equating the remaining scalar and vector components to zero separately yields a pair of equations in \mathbf{A}

\begin{aligned}0 &= \partial_t (\boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A}) \\ 0 &= -\frac{1}{{c^2}} \partial_{tt} \mathbf{A} + \boldsymbol{\nabla}^2 \mathbf{A} + \boldsymbol{\nabla} (\boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A}) \end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(34)

If the divergence of the vector potential is constant we have just a wave equation. Let’s see what that divergence is with the assumed Fourier representation

\begin{aligned}\boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A} &=\sum_{k \ne (0,0,0)} {\mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}^m 2 \pi i \frac{k_m}{\lambda_m} e^{2\pi i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} \\ &=2 \pi i \sum_{k \ne (0,0,0)} (\mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{k}) e^{2\pi i \mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{x}} \\ \end{aligned}

Since \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} = \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}(t), there are two ways for \partial_t (\boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{A}) = 0. For each \mathbf{k} \ne 0 there must be a requirement for either \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{k} = 0 or \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} = \text{constant}. The constant \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} solution to the first equation appears to represent a standing spatial wave with no time dependence. Is that of any interest?

The more interesting seeming case is where we have some non-static time varying state. In this case, if \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} \cdot \mathbf{k} for all \mathbf{k} \ne 0 the second of these Maxwell’s equations is just the vector potential wave equation, since the divergence is zero. That is

\begin{aligned}0 &= -\frac{1}{{c^2}} \partial_{tt} \mathbf{A} + \boldsymbol{\nabla}^2 \mathbf{A} \end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(36)

Solving this isn’t really what is of interest, since the objective was just to determine if the divergence could be assumed to be zero. This shows then, that if the transverse solution to Maxwell’s equation is picked, the Hamiltonian for this field, with this gauge choice, becomes

\begin{aligned}H = \frac{\epsilon_0}{c^2} \lambda_1 \lambda_2 \lambda_3 \sum_\mathbf{k}\left(\frac{1}{{2}} {\left\lvert{\dot{\mathbf{A}}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2+\frac{1}{{2}} (2 \pi c \mathbf{k})^2 {\left\lvert{\mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k}}\right\rvert}^2 \right).\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(37)

Conclusions and followup.

The objective was met, a reproduction of Bohm’s Harmonic oscillator result using a complex exponential Fourier series instead of separate sine and cosines.

The reason for Bohm’s choice to fix zero divergence as the gauge choice upfront is now clear. That automatically cuts complexity from the results. Figuring out how to work this problem with complex valued potentials and also using the Geometric Algebra formulation probably also made the work a bit more difficult since blundering through both simultaneously was required instead of just one at a time.

This was an interesting exercise though, since doing it this way I am able to understand all the intermediate steps. Bohm employed some subtler argumentation to eliminate the scalar potential \phi upfront, and I have to admit I did not follow his logic, whereas blindly following where the math leads me all makes sense.

As a bit of followup, I’d like to consider the constant \mathbf{A}_\mathbf{k} case, and any implications of the freedom to pick \mathbf{A}_0. I’d also like to construct the Poynting vector T(\gamma^0) \wedge \gamma_0, and see what the structure of that is with this Fourier representation.

A general calculation of T^{\mu\nu} for an assumed Fourier solution should be possible too, but working in spatial quantities for the general case is probably torture. A four dimensional Fourier series is likely a superior option for the general case.

References

[1] D. Bohm. Quantum Theory. Courier Dover Publications, 1989.

Posted in Math and Physics Learning. | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

A fun regular expression for the day. change all function calls to another.

Posted by peeterjoot on December 18, 2009

Hit some nasty old school code today that dates back to our one-time 16-bit OS/2 port. I figured out that 730 lines of code for an ancient function called sqlepost() could all be removed if I could make a change of all lines like so:

- sqlepost(SQLT_SQLE, SQLT_SQLE_SUBCOORD_TERM, 122, SQLE_EBAD_DB_ERR, sizeof(eRC), &eRC);
+ pdLog( PD_DEV, SQLT_SQLE_SUBCOORD_TERM, eRC, 122, PD_LEVEL_SEV, 0 ) ;

(83 places). A desirable side effect of making this change is that we will stop logging the return code as a byte reversed hex number, and instead log it as a return code. Easier on developers and system testers alike.

perl -p is once again a good friend for this sort of task

s/sqlepost\s*\(
\s*(.*?)\s*, # componentID -- unused.
\s*(.*?)\s*, # functionID
\s*(.*?)\s*, # probe
\s*(.*?)\s*, # index -- unused.
\s*(.*?)\s*, # size -- unused.
\s*&(.*?)\s*\)\s*; # rc
/pdLog( PD_DEV, $2, $6, $3, PD_LEVEL_SEV, 0 ) ;/x ;

I made a quick manual modification of each of the call sites that weren’t all in one line, with control-J in vim to put the whole function call on one line, then just had to run:

perl -p -i ./replacementScript `cat listOfFilesWithTheseCalls`

Voila! Very nice if I have to say so myself;)

EDIT: it was pointed out to me that the regular expressions used above are not entirely obvious.  Here’s a quick synopsis:

\s       space
.        any character
*        zero or more of the preceding
(.*)     capture an expression (creates $1, $2, ...)
            ie. zero or more of anything.
(.*?)    capture an expression, but don't be greedy, only capturing the
            minimal amount.
\(       a plain old start brace character (ie. non-capturing)
\)       a plain old end brace character.

Posted in C/C++ development and debugging., perl and general scripting hackery | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

do not expect ‘kill -SEGV’ to kill.

Posted by peeterjoot on December 18, 2009

Occasionally our (DB2) testers or developers try to crash our code for test purposes with externally driven ‘kill -SEGV pid’. Once upon a time I also expected this to “work”, but this was because of not understanding how one drives core-file creation on Unix after handling the signal. Code that handles SIGSEGV (or other similar typically fatal signals) can re-install the default handler, SIG_DFL, to drive this core file creation. This is best illustrated with a bit of sample code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <string.h>

struct sigaction oldAction ;
char * null = 0 ;

extern "C"
void h( int sig )
{
   printf( "externally driven SEGV\n" ) ;

   // put things back to SIG_DFL, the old action, to drive core creation.
   sigaction( SIGSEGV, &oldAction, NULL ) ;
}

int main()
{
   struct sigaction a ;
   a.sa_flags = 0 ;
   sigemptyset( &a.sa_mask ) ;
   a.sa_handler = h ;

   sigaction( SIGSEGV, &a, &oldAction ) ;

   printf( "pre-sleep: pid: %u\n", (unsigned)getpid() ) ;

   sleep( 60 ) ;

   printf( "post-sleep... crashing for real\n" ) ;
   fflush( NULL ) ;

   memset( null, 0, 29472 ) ;

   printf( "post memset.  shouldn't get here\n" ) ;

   return 0 ;
}

If you execute this code, it will spit out the pid, and you can use that in a different window to drive a ‘kill -SEGV’. Here is output for such an attempt:

$ a.out
pre-sleep: pid: 5550
externally driven SEGV
post-sleep... crashing for real
Segmentation fault

The signal is caught by this trivial handler, a message printed, and it returns after putting the handler back (implicitly) to SIG_DFL. At that point a SIGSEGV will take us out, and the memset does so.

Note: This code sample is for illustration purposes, and is understood to be faulty in many ways. There is no rc checking for syscalls, the handler is not signal safe due to use of printf, sa_sigaction with SA_SIGINFO ought to be used to see if the signal was externally generated using the siginfo_t data (restoring SIG_DFL is not appropriate in that case), …

Posted in C/C++ development and debugging. | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Abusing the Git version control system as a distributed filesystem.

Posted by peeterjoot on December 16, 2009

Motivation

I’ve switched from RCS to GIT as the VCS for my personal math and physics play latex source. I am currently using github to host all this stuff, and while this means that everybody has access to my sources (even drafts), I don’t really mind too much. Since there are not many that read even the final versions of this play math, this draft state is likely of even less interest.

Having done this and learned some GIT basics, I have also made the somewhat curious choice of using this VCS to host my personal internal scripts at work. I have many of these scripts checked into our clearcase repository which gives me access on all our development machines, so why would I use GIT?

The why is because it is easy. It is a bit of a pain to make quick and hacky changes to things that I have checked into clearcase. I have to open and accept a defect, merge and checkin my branch, and wait for the cronjob for our tools snapshot view to kick in and reload any changes I’ve made.

This inconvience is enough that I’ve gradually ended up with a hodge podge mix of some things in clearcase, some things on local file systems, some on our “deprecated” lab AFS (distributed filesystem), and some on NFS. I got a bit tired of this, and am now migrating all my private scripts and junk to git uniformly. This gives me the benefit of version control, while retaining the ease of modification that I have with purely local files. Because all GIT repository copies are all just as good as the other, I also have no dependency on flaky NFS servers.

Unlike my personal stuff I am obviously not using a public github hosted repository for work related stuff, but all I need is ssh keys available on my development machines to host things internally on any number of potential locations. I can push and pull local changes on any specific machine that I happen to be working with at the time with a –bare repository on an arbitrarily elected “repo server”. If that machine goes down any of the other recently used versions of my repository on some other machine can function as the master (either temporarily or permanently).

Setup a local repository

Getting started is pretty easy. Something like this will do the trick to get yourself an initial repository

$ cd
$ mkdir myjunk
$ cd myjunk
$ git init

You’ve now got a git repo with nothing in it. Supposing you’ve already got a crapload of stuff that you want under version control in directory ~/stuff, do the following

$ cp -a ~/stuff .
$ find stuff | xargs git add
$ git commit -a

The add tells the git repository about the file, directory or symlinks that you’ve copied into your repository. This is just a placeholder for the object and the ‘git commit’ actually creates it. If your intention was to sync this with a master (perhaps public like github) repository then nobody else will see it yet. If you were to, say, loose your harddrive at this point without backup, then even commited are toast because they haven’t been synced up (pushed) with anybody else.

One of the reasons I like using RCS is that it is really easy. You can get away with just a couple commands (‘co -l’, or ‘ci -l’ and rcsdiff). Git is actually easier. Once you’ve got a git repository directory created, checkout is implicit, so you just have to edit. ‘git commit filename’, or ‘git commit -a’ is the checkout and checkin equivalent, much like a ‘ci -l’ in RCS.

Setup a master repository

If your aim, like mine, is to share stuff across multiple machines, then you’ll want a separate master copy of the repository in addition to the working version you started with. This version will be different, in that it houses only the VCS meta and raw data, and has no visible directory structure. Such a master repository can be created with ‘git init –bare’, but we can also create it as a copy directly with something like: Creation is the same, but you’ll want a different directory name, and also use the ‘–bare’ flag when you create it. This would be something like:

$ cd
$ git clone --bare myjunk .myjunk.git
Initialized empty Git repository in /home/peeterj/.myjunk.git/

A directory listing will show you something like:

$ ls .myjunk.git
branches  config  description  HEAD  hooks  info  objects  packed-refs  refs

The config file and other stuff that was in the .git directory in a non-bare repository is now in the top most directory. Having created this I can now go to my working repository and use set this as the master copy to synchronize with

$ cd ~/myjunk
$ git remote add origin peeterj@machine1:test/.myjunk.git
$ cat .git/config
[core]
        repositoryformatversion = 0
        filemode = true
        bare = false
        logallrefupdates = true
[remote "origin"]
        url = peeterj@machine1:.myjunk.git
        fetch = +refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/*
$ git push origin master
Everything up-to-date
$ git pull origin master
From machine1:.myjunk
 * branch            master     -> FETCH_HEAD
Already up-to-date.

Now getting your code on another machine is just another clone call, like

$ git clone peeterj@machine1:.myjunk.git anotherjunk
Initialized empty Git repository in /home/peeterj/anotherjunk/.git/
remote: Counting objects: 4430, done.
remote: Compressing objects: 100% (4124/4124), done.
remote: Total 4430 (delta 1216), reused 0 (delta 0)
Receiving objects: 100% (4430/4430), 8.12 MiB | 3.60 MiB/s, done.
Resolving deltas: 100% (1216/1216), done.

Here you specify the repository created with –bare as the location to copy from. By default git uses ssh, so have that setup for passwordless login (or be prepared to supply your password on each push and pull).

Some basic commands

Now that a master repository is setup, and working copies are in place on two or more machines, we are set to use it. One of the real powers of any modern VCS is the ability to handle merges and concurrent updates, but if using this as a personal distributed file system you probably can avoid any knowledge of how to do this for quite a while. Before making updates on a machine that hasn’t been used for a while, a pull will get you anything you’ve pushed recently. This could look something like

$ git pull origin master
remote: Counting objects: 50, done.
remote: Compressing objects: 100% (43/43), done.
remote: Total 43 (delta 30), reused 0 (delta 0)
Unpacking objects: 100% (43/43), done.
From machine1:.myjunk
 * branch            master     -> FETCH_HEAD
Updating e3c0c9c..ff49140
Fast forward
 bin/README     |    4 +
 bin/cfKiller   |  220 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 bin/cfpool     |    4 +-
 bin/homeclean  |    2 +-
 bin/killca     |    1 +
 bin/updateLoop |    2 +-
 6 files changed, 230 insertions(+), 3 deletions(-)
 create mode 100755 bin/cfKiller

and when you are done working on this machine for the day, or when you want to sync something up for use on a different machine, commit anything outstanding (ie. checkin), and then push it to the master for a pull from somewhere else.

$ git commit -a
...
".git/COMMIT_EDITMSG" 13L, 333C written
[master 13ec34c] add -noauto
 1 files changed, 65 insertions(+), 1 deletions(-)
 rewrite bin/fm (100%)
$ git push origin master
Counting objects: 7, done.
Delta compression using up to 8 threads.
Compressing objects: 100% (4/4), done.
Writing objects: 100% (4/4), 1.21 KiB, done.
Total 4 (delta 2), reused 0 (delta 0)
To peeterj@machine1:.myjunk.git
   ff49140..13ec34c  master -> master

That’s all there is to using git as an ad-hoc distributed file system. It can be used this way like a version controlled rsync.

merging and branching … or not.

For my own use only to synchronize things across multiple machines, I don’t have any reason to use the branching or merging facilities. Merging is actually fairly intuitive, and I tried introducing a couple of conflicts since I was curious how it was done. If a conflicting change has been pushed, a pull will notify you of a merge requirement, and the default merge method appears to leave diff3 -m output in the file to be merged. Edit that, run ‘git add ./path_to_conflicting_file’ to mark it merged, commit the file(s), and push and you are done.

Posted in Development environment | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

Energy and momentum for Complex electric and magnetic field phasors.

Posted by peeterjoot on December 15, 2009

[Click here for a PDF of this post with nicer formatting]

Motivation.

In [1] a complex phasor representations of the electric and magnetic fields is used

\begin{aligned}\mathbf{E} &= \boldsymbol{\mathcal{E}} e^{-i\omega t} \\ \mathbf{B} &= \mathbf{B} e^{-i\omega t}.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(1)

Here the vectors \boldsymbol{\mathcal{E}} and \mathbf{B} are allowed to take on complex values. Jackson uses the real part of these complex vectors as the true fields, so one is really interested in just these quantities

\begin{aligned}\text{Real} \mathbf{E} &= \boldsymbol{\mathcal{E}}_r \cos(\omega t) + \boldsymbol{\mathcal{E}}_i \sin(\omega t) \\ \text{Real} \mathbf{B} &= \mathbf{B}_r \cos(\omega t) + \mathbf{B}_i \sin(\omega t),\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(3)

but carry the whole thing in manipulations to make things simpler. It is stated that the energy for such complex vector fields takes the form (ignoring constant scaling factors and units)

\begin{aligned}\text{Energy} \propto \mathbf{E} \cdot {\mathbf{E}}^{*} + \mathbf{B} \cdot {\mathbf{B}}^{*}.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(5)

In some ways this is an obvious generalization. Less obvious is how this and the Poynting vector are related in their corresponding conservation relationships.

Here I explore this, employing a Geometric Algebra representation of the energy momentum tensor based on the real field representation found in [2]. Given the complex valued fields and a requirement that both the real and imaginary parts of the field satisfy Maxwell’s equation, it should be possible to derive the conservation relationship between the energy density and Poynting vector from first principles.

Review of GA formalism for real fields.

In SI units the Geometric algebra form of Maxwell’s equation is

\begin{aligned}\nabla F &= J/\epsilon_0 c,\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(6)

where one has for the symbols

\begin{aligned}F &= \mathbf{E} + c I \mathbf{B} \\ I &= \gamma_0 \gamma_1 \gamma_2 \gamma_3 \\ \mathbf{E} &= E^k \gamma_k \gamma_0  \\ \mathbf{B} &= B^k \gamma_k \gamma_0  \\ (\gamma^0)^2 &= -(\gamma^k)^2 = 1 \\ \gamma^\mu \cdot \gamma_\nu &= {\delta^\mu}_\nu \\ J &= c \rho \gamma_0 + J^k \gamma_k \\ \nabla &= \gamma^\mu \partial_\mu = \gamma^\mu {\partial {}}/{\partial {x^\mu}}.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(7)

The symmetric electrodynamic energy momentum tensor for real fields \mathbf{E} and \mathbf{B} is

\begin{aligned}T(a) &= \frac{-\epsilon_0}{2} F a F = \frac{\epsilon_0}{2} F a \tilde{F}.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(15)

It may not be obvious that this is in fact a four vector, but this can be seen since it can only have grade one and three components, and also equals its reverse implying that the grade three terms are all zero. To illustrate this explicitly consider the components of T^{\mu 0}

\begin{aligned}\frac{2}{\epsilon_0} T(\gamma^0) &= -(\mathbf{E} + c I \mathbf{B}) \gamma^0 (\mathbf{E} + c I \mathbf{B}) \\ &= (\mathbf{E} + c I \mathbf{B}) (\mathbf{E} - c I \mathbf{B}) \gamma^0 \\ &= (\mathbf{E}^2 + c^2 \mathbf{B}^2 + c I (\mathbf{B} \mathbf{E} - \mathbf{E} \mathbf{B})) \gamma^0 \\ &= (\mathbf{E}^2 + c^2 \mathbf{B}^2) \gamma^0 + 2 c I ( \mathbf{B} \wedge \mathbf{E} ) \gamma^0 \\ &= (\mathbf{E}^2 + c^2 \mathbf{B}^2) \gamma^0 + 2 c ( \mathbf{E} \times \mathbf{B} ) \gamma^0 \\ \end{aligned}

Our result is a four vector in the Dirac basis as expected

\begin{aligned}T(\gamma^0) &= T^{\mu 0} \gamma_\mu \\ T^{0 0} &= \frac{\epsilon_0}{2} (\mathbf{E}^2 + c^2 \mathbf{B}^2) \\ T^{k 0} &= c \epsilon_0 (\mathbf{E} \times \mathbf{B})_k \end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(16)

Similar expansions are possible for the general tensor components T^{\mu\nu} but lets defer this more general expansion until considering complex valued fields. The main point here is to remind oneself how to express the energy momentum tensor in a fashion that is natural in a GA context. We also know that one has a conservation relationship associated with the divergence of this tensor \nabla \cdot T(a) (ie. \partial_\mu T^{\mu\nu}), and want to rederive this relationship after guessing what form the GA expression for the energy momentum tensor takes when one allows the field vectors to take complex values.

Computing the conservation relationship for complex field vectors.

As in 5, if one wants

\begin{aligned}T^{0 0} \propto \mathbf{E} \cdot {\mathbf{E}}^{*} + c^2 \mathbf{B} \cdot {\mathbf{B}}^{*},\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(19)

it is reasonable to assume that our energy momentum tensor will take the form

\begin{aligned}T(a) &= \frac{\epsilon_0}{4} \left( {{F}}^{*} a \tilde{F} + \tilde{F} a {{F}}^{*} \right)= \frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \text{Real} \left( {{F}}^{*} a \tilde{F} \right)\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(20)

For real vector fields this reduces to the previous results and should produce the desired mix of real and imaginary dot products for the energy density term of the tensor. This is also a real four vector even when the field is complex, so the energy density and power density terms will all be real valued, which seems desirable.

Expanding the tensor. Easy parts.

As with real fields expansion of T(a) in terms of \mathbf{E} and \mathbf{B} is simplest for a = \gamma^0. Let’s start with that.

\begin{aligned}\frac{4}{\epsilon_0} T(\gamma^0) \gamma_0&=-({\mathbf{E}}^{*} + c I {\mathbf{B}}^{*} )\gamma^0 (\mathbf{E} + c I \mathbf{B}) \gamma_0-(\mathbf{E} + c I \mathbf{B} )\gamma^0 ({\mathbf{E}}^{*} + c I {\mathbf{B}}^{*} ) \gamma_0 \\ &=({\mathbf{E}}^{*} + c I {\mathbf{B}}^{*} ) (\mathbf{E} - c I \mathbf{B}) +(\mathbf{E} + c I \mathbf{B} ) ({\mathbf{E}}^{*} - c I {\mathbf{B}}^{*} ) \\ &={\mathbf{E}}^{*} \mathbf{E} + \mathbf{E} {\mathbf{E}}^{*} + c^2 ({\mathbf{B}}^{*} \mathbf{B} + \mathbf{B} {\mathbf{B}}^{*} ) + c I ( {\mathbf{B}}^{*} \mathbf{E} - {\mathbf{E}}^{*} \mathbf{B} + \mathbf{B} {\mathbf{E}}^{*} - \mathbf{E} {\mathbf{B}}^{*} ) \\ &=2 \mathbf{E} \cdot {\mathbf{E}}^{*} + 2 c^2 \mathbf{B} \cdot {\mathbf{B}}^{*}+ 2 c ( \mathbf{E} \times {\mathbf{B}}^{*} + {\mathbf{E}}^{*} \times \mathbf{B} ).\end{aligned}

This gives

\begin{aligned}T(\gamma^0) &=\frac{\epsilon_0}{2} \left( \mathbf{E} \cdot {\mathbf{E}}^{*} + c^2 \mathbf{B} \cdot {\mathbf{B}}^{*} \right) \gamma^0+ \frac{\epsilon_0 c}{2} ( \mathbf{E} \times {\mathbf{B}}^{*} + {\mathbf{E}}^{*} \times \mathbf{B} ) \gamma^0\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(21)

The sum of {{F}}^{*} a F and its conjugate has produced the desired energy density expression. An implication of this is that one can form and take real parts of a complex Poynting vector \mathbf{S} \propto \mathbf{E} \times {\mathbf{B}}^{*} to calculate the momentum density. This is stated but not demonstrated in Jackson, perhaps considered too obvious or messy to derive.

Observe that the a choice to work with complex valued vector fields gives a nice consistency, and one has the same factor of 1/2 in both the energy and momentum terms. While the energy term is obviously real, the momentum terms can be written in an explicitly real notation as well since one has a quantity plus its conjugate. Using a more conventional four vector notation (omitting the explicit Dirac basis vectors), one can write this out as a strictly real quantity.

\begin{aligned}T(\gamma^0) &=\epsilon_0 \Bigl( \frac{1}{{2}}(\mathbf{E} \cdot {\mathbf{E}}^{*} + c^2 \mathbf{B} \cdot {\mathbf{B}}^{*}),c \text{Real}( \mathbf{E} \times {\mathbf{B}}^{*} ) \Bigr)\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(22)

Observe that when the vector fields are restricted to real quantities, the conjugate and real part operators can be dropped and the real vector field result 16 is recovered.

Expanding the tensor. Messier parts.

I intended here to compute T(\gamma^k), and my starting point was a decomposition of the field vectors into components that anticommute or commute with \gamma^k

\begin{aligned}\mathbf{E} &= \mathbf{E}_\parallel + \mathbf{E}_\perp \\ \mathbf{B} &= \mathbf{B}_\parallel + \mathbf{B}_\perp.\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(23)

The components parallel to the spatial vector \sigma_k = \gamma_k \gamma_0 are anticommuting \gamma^k \mathbf{E}_\parallel = -\mathbf{E}_\parallel \gamma^k, whereas the perpendicular components commute \gamma^k \mathbf{E}_\perp = \mathbf{E}_\perp \gamma^k. The expansion of the tensor products is then

\begin{aligned}({{F}}^{*} \gamma^k \tilde{F} + \tilde{F} \gamma^k {{F}}^{*}) \gamma_k&= - ({\mathbf{E}}^{*} + I c {\mathbf{B}}^{*}) \gamma^k ( \mathbf{E}_\parallel + \mathbf{E}_\perp + c I ( \mathbf{B}_\parallel + \mathbf{B}_\perp ) ) \gamma_k \\ &- (\mathbf{E} + I c \mathbf{B}) \gamma^k ( {\mathbf{E}_\parallel}^{*} + {\mathbf{E}_\perp}^{*} + c I ( {\mathbf{B}_\parallel}^{*} + {\mathbf{B}_\perp}^{*} ) ) \gamma_k \\ &=  ({\mathbf{E}}^{*} + I c {\mathbf{B}}^{*}) ( \mathbf{E}_\parallel - \mathbf{E}_\perp + c I ( -\mathbf{B}_\parallel + \mathbf{B}_\perp ) ) \\ &+ (\mathbf{E} + I c \mathbf{B}) ( {\mathbf{E}_\parallel}^{*} - {\mathbf{E}_\perp}^{*} + c I ( -{\mathbf{B}_\parallel}^{*} + {\mathbf{B}_\perp}^{*} ) ) \\ \end{aligned}

This isn’t particularly pretty to expand out. I did attempt it, but my result looked wrong. For the application I have in mind I do not actually need anything more than T^{\mu 0}, so rather than show something wrong, I’ll just omit it (at least for now).

Calculating the divergence.

Working with 20, let’s calculate the divergence and see what one finds for the corresponding conservation relationship.

\begin{aligned}\frac{4}{\epsilon_0} \nabla \cdot T(a) &=\left\langle{{ \nabla ( {{F}}^{*} a \tilde{F} + \tilde{F} a {{F}}^{*} )}}\right\rangle \\ &=-\left\langle{{ F \stackrel{ \leftrightarrow }\nabla {{F}}^{*} a + {{F}}^{*} \stackrel{ \leftrightarrow }\nabla F a }}\right\rangle \\ &=-{\left\langle{{ F \stackrel{ \leftrightarrow }\nabla {{F}}^{*} + {{F}}^{*} \stackrel{ \leftrightarrow }\nabla F }}\right\rangle}_{1} \cdot a \\ &=-{\left\langle{{ F \stackrel{ \rightarrow }\nabla {{F}}^{*} +F \stackrel{ \leftarrow }\nabla {{F}}^{*} + {{F}}^{*} \stackrel{ \leftarrow }\nabla F+ {{F}}^{*} \stackrel{ \rightarrow }\nabla F}}\right\rangle}_{1} \cdot a \\ &=-\frac{1}{{\epsilon_0 c}} {\left\langle{{ F {{J}}^{*} - J {{F}}^{*} - {{J}}^{*} F+ {{F}}^{*} J}}\right\rangle}_{1} \cdot a \\ &= \frac{2}{\epsilon_0 c} a \cdot ( J \cdot {{F}}^{*} + {{J}}^{*} \cdot F) \\ &= \frac{4}{\epsilon_0 c} a \cdot \text{Real} ( J \cdot {{F}}^{*} ).\end{aligned}

We have then for the divergence

\begin{aligned}\nabla \cdot T(a) &= a \cdot \frac{1}{{ c }} \text{Real} \left( J \cdot {{F}}^{*} \right).\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(25)

Lets write out J \cdot {{F}}^{*} in the (stationary) observer frame where J = (c\rho + \mathbf{J}) \gamma_0. This is

\begin{aligned}J \cdot {{F}}^{*} &={\left\langle{{ (c\rho + \mathbf{J}) \gamma_0 ( {\mathbf{E}}^{*} + I c {\mathbf{B}}^{*} ) }}\right\rangle}_{1} \\ &=- (\mathbf{J} \cdot {\mathbf{E}}^{*} ) \gamma_0- c \left( \rho {\mathbf{E}}^{*} + \mathbf{J} \times {\mathbf{B}}^{*}\right) \gamma_0\end{aligned}

Writing out the four divergence relationships in full one has

\begin{aligned}\nabla \cdot T(\gamma^0) &= - \frac{1}{{ c }} \text{Real}( \mathbf{J} \cdot {\mathbf{E}}^{*} ) \\ \nabla \cdot T(\gamma^k) &= - \text{Real} \left( \rho {{(E^k)}}^{*} + (\mathbf{J} \times {\mathbf{B}}^{*})_k \right)\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(26)

Just as in the real field case one has a nice relativistic split into energy density and force (momentum change) components, but one has to take real parts and conjugate half the terms appropriately when one has complex fields.

Combining the divergence relation for T(\gamma^0) with 22 the conservation relation for this subset of the energy momentum tensor becomes

\begin{aligned}\frac{1}{{c}} \frac{\partial {}}{\partial {t}}\frac{\epsilon_0}{2}(\mathbf{E} \cdot {\mathbf{E}}^{*} + c^2 \mathbf{B} \cdot {\mathbf{B}}^{*})+ c \epsilon_0 \text{Real} \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot (\mathbf{E} \times {\mathbf{B}}^{*} )=- \frac{1}{{c}} \text{Real}( \mathbf{J} \cdot {\mathbf{E}}^{*} ) \end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(28)

Or

\begin{aligned}\frac{\partial {}}{\partial {t}}\frac{\epsilon_0}{2}(\mathbf{E} \cdot {\mathbf{E}}^{*} + c^2 \mathbf{B} \cdot {\mathbf{B}}^{*})+ \text{Real} \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \frac{1}{{\mu_0}} (\mathbf{E} \times {\mathbf{B}}^{*} )+ \text{Real}( \mathbf{J} \cdot {\mathbf{E}}^{*} ) = 0\end{aligned} \quad\quad\quad(29)

It is this last term that puts some meaning behind Jackson’s treatment since we now know how the energy and momentum are related as a four vector quantity in this complex formalism.

While I’ve used geometric algebra to get to this final result, I would be interested to compare how the intermediate mess compares with the same complex field vector result obtained via traditional vector techniques. I am sure I could try this myself, but am not interested enough to attempt it.

Instead, now that this result is obtained, proceeding on to application is now possible. My intention is to try the vacuum electromagnetic energy density example from [3] using complex exponential Fourier series instead of the doubled sum of sines and cosines that Bohm used.

References

[1] JD Jackson. Classical Electrodynamics Wiley. 2nd edition, 1975.

[2] C. Doran and A.N. Lasenby. Geometric algebra for physicists. Cambridge University Press New York, Cambridge, UK, 1st edition, 2003.

[3] D. Bohm. Quantum Theory. Courier Dover Publications, 1989.

Posted in Math and Physics Learning. | Tagged: , , , , , | 3 Comments »