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Posts Tagged ‘canonical ensemble’

Final version of my phy452.pdf notes posted

Posted by peeterjoot on September 5, 2013

I’d intended to rework the exam problems over the summer and make that the last update to my stat mech notes. However, I ended up studying world events and some other non-mainstream ideas intensively over the summer, and never got around to that final update.

Since I’m starting a new course (condensed matter) soon, I’ll end up having to focus on that, and have now posted a final version of my notes as is.

Since the last update the following additions were made

September 05, 2013 Large volume fermi gas density

May 30, 2013 Bernoulli polynomials and numbers and Euler-MacLauren summation

May 09, 2013 Bose gas specific heat above condensation temperature

May 09, 2013 A dumb expansion of the Fermi-Dirac grand partition function

April 30, 2013 Ultra relativistic spin zero condensation temperature

April 30, 2013 Summary of statistical mechanics relations and helpful formulas

April 24, 2013 Low temperature Fermi gas chemical potential

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Summary of statistical mechanics relations and helpful formulas (cheat sheet fodder)

Posted by peeterjoot on April 29, 2013

[Click here for a PDF of this post with nicer formatting (especially if my latex to wordpress script has left FORMULA DOES NOT PARSE errors.)]

Central limit theorem

If \left\langle{{x}}\right\rangle = \mu and \sigma^2 = \left\langle{{x^2}}\right\rangle - \left\langle{{x}}\right\rangle^2, and X = \sum x, then in the limit

\begin{aligned}\lim_{N \rightarrow \infty} P(X)= \frac{1}{{\sigma \sqrt{2 \pi N}}} \exp\left( - \frac{ (x - N \mu)^2}{2 N \sigma^2} \right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.1a)

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{X}}\right\rangle = N \mu\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.1b)

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{X^2}}\right\rangle - \left\langle{{X}}\right\rangle^2 = N \sigma^2\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.1c)

Binomial distribution

\begin{aligned}P_N(X) = \left\{\begin{array}{l l}\left(\frac{1}{{2}}\right)^N \frac{N!}{\left(\frac{N-X}{2}\right)!\left(\frac{N+X}{2}\right)!}& \quad \mbox{if X and N have same parity} \\ 0 & \quad \mbox{otherwise} \end{array},\right.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.2)

where X was something like number of Heads minus number of Tails.

Generating function

Given the Fourier transform of a probability distribution \tilde{P}(k) we have

\begin{aligned}{\left.{{ \frac{\partial^n}{\partial k^n}    \tilde{P}(k) }}\right\vert}_{{k = 0}}= (-i)^n \left\langle{{x^n}}\right\rangle\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.2)

Handy mathematics

\begin{aligned}\ln( 1 + x ) = x - \frac{x^2}{2} + \frac{x^3}{3} - \frac{x^4}{4}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.2)

\begin{aligned}N! \approx \sqrt{ 2 \pi N} N^N e^{-N}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.5)

\begin{aligned}\ln N! \approx \frac{1}{{2}} \ln 2 \pi -N + \left( N + \frac{1}{{2}}  \right)\ln N \approx N \ln N - N\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.6)

\begin{aligned}\text{erf}(z) = \frac{2}{\sqrt{\pi}} \int_0^z e^{-t^2} dt\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.7)

\begin{aligned}\Gamma(\alpha) = \int_0^\infty dy e^{-y} y^{\alpha - 1}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.8)

\begin{aligned}\Gamma(\alpha + 1) = \alpha \Gamma(\alpha)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.9)

\begin{aligned}\Gamma\left( 1/2 \right) = \sqrt{\pi}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.10)

\begin{aligned}\zeta(s) = \sum_{k=1}^{\infty} k^{-s}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.10)

\begin{aligned}\begin{aligned}\zeta(3/2) &\approx 2.61238 \\ \zeta(2) &\approx 1.64493 \\ \zeta(5/2) &\approx 1.34149 \\ \zeta(3) &\approx 1.20206\end{aligned}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.12)

\begin{aligned}\Gamma(z) \Gamma(1-z) = \frac{\pi}{\sin(\pi z)}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.12)

\begin{aligned}P(x, t) = \int_{-\infty}^\infty \frac{dk}{2 \pi} \tilde{P}(k, t) \exp\left( i k x \right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.14a)

\begin{aligned}\tilde{P}(k, t) = \int_{-\infty}^\infty dx P(x, t) \exp\left( -i k x \right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.14b)

Heavyside theta

\begin{aligned}\Theta(x) = \left\{\begin{array}{l l}1 & \quad x \ge 0 \\ 0 & \quad x < 0\end{array}\right.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.15a)

\begin{aligned}\frac{d\Theta}{dx} = \delta(x)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.15b)

\begin{aligned}\sum_{m = -l}^l a^m=\frac{a^{l + 1/2} - a^{-(l+1/2)}}{a^{1/2} - a^{-1/2}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16.16)

\begin{aligned}\sum_{m = -l}^l e^{b m}=\frac{\sinh(b(l + 1/2))}{\sinh(b/2)}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16b)

\begin{aligned}\int_{-\infty}^\infty q^{2 N} e^{-a q^2} dq=\frac{(2 N - 1)!!}{(2a)^N} \sqrt{\frac{\pi}{a}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.17.17)

\begin{aligned}\int_{-\infty}^\infty e^{-a q^2} dq=\sqrt{\frac{\pi}{a}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.17.17)

\begin{aligned}\binom{-\left\lvert {m} \right\rvert}{k} = (-1)^k \frac{\left\lvert {m} \right\rvert}{\left\lvert {m} \right\rvert + k} \binom{\left\lvert {m} \right\rvert+k}{\left\lvert {m} \right\rvert}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.18)

\begin{aligned}\int_0^\infty d\epsilon \frac{\epsilon^3}{e^{\beta \epsilon} - 1} =\frac{\pi ^4}{15 \beta ^4},\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.18)

volume in mD

\begin{aligned}V_m= \frac{ \pi^{m/2} R^{m} }{   \Gamma\left( m/2 + 1 \right)}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.20)

area of ellipse

\begin{aligned}A = \pi a b\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.21)

Radius of gyration of a 3D polymer

With radius a, we have

\begin{aligned}r_N \approx a \sqrt{N}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.21)

Velocity random walk

Find

\begin{aligned}\mathcal{P}_{N_{\mathrm{c}}}(\mathbf{v}) \propto e^{-\frac{(\mathbf{v} - \mathbf{v}_0)^2}{2 N_{\mathrm{c}}}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.23)

Random walk

1D Random walk

\begin{aligned}\mathcal{P}( x, t ) = \frac{1}{{2}} \mathcal{P}(x + \delta x, t - \delta t)+\frac{1}{{2}} \mathcal{P}(x - \delta x, t - \delta t)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.23)

leads to

\begin{aligned}\frac{\partial {\mathcal{P}}}{\partial {t}}(x, t) =\frac{1}{{2}} \frac{(\delta x)^2}{\delta t}\frac{\partial^2 {{\mathcal{P}}}}{\partial {{x}}^2}(x, t) = D \frac{\partial^2 {{\mathcal{P}}}}{\partial {{x}}^2}(x, t) = -\frac{\partial {J}}{\partial {x}},\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.25)

The diffusion constant relation to the probability current is referred to as Fick’s law

\begin{aligned}D = -\frac{\partial {J}}{\partial {x}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.25)

with which we can cast the probability diffusion identity into a continuity equation form

\begin{aligned}\frac{\partial {\mathcal{P}}}{\partial {t}} + \frac{\partial {J}}{\partial {x}} = 0 \end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.25)

In 3D (with the Maxwell distribution frictional term), this takes the form

\begin{aligned}\mathbf{j} = -D \boldsymbol{\nabla}_\mathbf{v} c(\mathbf{v}, t) - \eta \mathbf{v} c(\mathbf{v}, t)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.28a)

\begin{aligned}\frac{\partial {}}{\partial {t}} c(\mathbf{v}, t) + \boldsymbol{\nabla}_\mathbf{v} \cdot \mathbf{j}(\mathbf{v}, t) = 0\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.28b)

Maxwell distribution

Add a frictional term to the velocity space diffusion current

\begin{aligned}j_v = -D \frac{\partial {c}}{\partial {v}}(v, t) - \eta v c(v).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.29)

For steady state the continity equation 0 = \frac{dc}{dt} = -\frac{\partial {j_v}}{\partial {v}} leads to

\begin{aligned}c(v) \propto \exp\left(- \frac{\eta v^2}{2 D}\right).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.30)

We also find

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{v^2}}\right\rangle = \frac{D}{\eta},\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.30)

and identify

\begin{aligned}\frac{1}{{2}} m \left\langle{{\mathbf{v}^2}}\right\rangle = \frac{1}{{2}} m \left( \frac{D}{\eta} \right) = \frac{1}{{2}} k_{\mathrm{B}} T\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.32)

Hamilton’s equations

\begin{aligned}\frac{\partial {H}}{\partial {p}} = \dot{x}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.33a)

\begin{aligned}\frac{\partial {H}}{\partial {x}} = -\dot{p}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.33b)

SHO

\begin{aligned}H = \frac{p^2}{2m} + \frac{1}{{2}} k x^2\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.34a)

\begin{aligned}\omega^2 = \frac{k}{m}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.34b)

Quantum energy eigenvalues

\begin{aligned}E_n = \left( n + \frac{1}{{2}}  \right) \hbar \omega\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.35)

Liouville’s theorem

\begin{aligned}\frac{d{{\rho}}}{dt} = \frac{\partial {\rho}}{\partial {t}} + \dot{x} \frac{\partial {\rho}}{\partial {x}} + \dot{p} \frac{\partial {\rho}}{\partial {p}}=  \cdots  = \frac{\partial {\rho}}{\partial {t}} + \frac{\partial {\left( \dot{x} \rho \right)}}{\partial {x}} + \frac{\partial {\left( \dot{x} \rho \right)}}{\partial {p}} = \frac{\partial {\rho}}{\partial {t}} + \boldsymbol{\nabla}_{x,p} \cdot (\rho \dot{x}, \rho \dot{p})= \frac{\partial {\rho}}{\partial {t}} + \boldsymbol{\nabla} \cdot \mathbf{J}= 0,\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.35)

Regardless of whether we have a steady state system, if we sit on a region of phase space volume, the probability density in that neighbourhood will be constant.

Ergodic

A system for which all accessible phase space is swept out by the trajectories. This and Liouville’s threorm allows us to assume that we can treat any given small phase space volume as if it is equally probable to the same time evolved phase space region, and switch to ensemble averaging instead of time averaging.

Thermodynamics

\begin{aligned}dE = T dS - P dV + \mu dN\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.37.37)

\begin{aligned}\frac{1}{{T}} = \left({\partial {S}}/{\partial {E}}\right)_{{N,V}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.37.37)

\begin{aligned}\frac{P}{T} = \left({\partial {S}}/{\partial {V}}\right)_{{N,E}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.37.37)

\begin{aligned}-\frac{\mu}{T} = \left({\partial {S}}/{\partial {N}}\right)_{{V,E}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.37.37)

\begin{aligned}P = - \left({\partial {E}}/{\partial {V}}\right)_{{N,S}}= - \left({\partial {F}}/{\partial {V}}\right)_{{N,T}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.37e)

\begin{aligned}\mu = \left({\partial {E}}/{\partial {N}}\right)_{{V,S}} = \left({\partial {F}}/{\partial {N}}\right)_{{V,T}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.37e)

\begin{aligned}T = \left({\partial {E}}/{\partial {S}}\right)_{{N,V}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.37e)

\begin{aligned}F = E - TS\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.37e)

\begin{aligned}G = F + P V = E - T S + P V = \mu N\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.37i)

\begin{aligned}H = E + P V = G + T S\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.37j)

\begin{aligned}C_{\mathrm{V}} = T \left({\partial {S}}/{\partial {T}}\right)_{{N,V}} = \left({\partial {E}}/{\partial {T}}\right)_{{N,V}} = - T \left( \frac{\partial^2 {{F}}}{\partial {{T}}^2}  \right)_{N,V}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.37k)

\begin{aligned}C_{\mathrm{P}} = T \left({\partial {S}}/{\partial {T}}\right)_{{N,P}} = \left({\partial {H}}/{\partial {T}}\right)_{{N,P}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.37l)

\begin{aligned}\underbrace{dE}_{\text{Change in energy}}=\underbrace{d W}_{\text{work done on the system}}+\underbrace{d Q}_{\text{Heat supplied to the system}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.38)

Example (work on gas): d W = -P dV. Adiabatic: d Q = 0. Cyclic: dE = 0.

Microstates

\begin{aligned}\beta = \frac{1}{k_{\mathrm{B}} T}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.38)

\begin{aligned}S = k_{\mathrm{B}} \ln \Omega \end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.40)

\begin{aligned}\Omega(N, V, E) = \frac{1}{h^{3N} N!} \int_V d\mathbf{x}_1  \cdots  d\mathbf{x}_N \int d\mathbf{p}_1  \cdots  d\mathbf{p}_N \delta \left(E - \frac{\mathbf{p}_1^2}{2 m} \cdots - \frac{\mathbf{p}_N^2}{2 m}\right)=\frac{V^N}{h^{3N} N!}\int d\mathbf{p}_1  \cdots d\mathbf{p}_N \delta \left(E - \frac{\mathbf{p}_1^2}{2m} \cdots - \frac{\mathbf{p}_N^2}{2m}\right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.40)

\begin{aligned}\Omega = \frac{d\gamma}{dE}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

\begin{aligned}\gamma=\frac{V^N}{h^{3N} N!}\int d\mathbf{p}_1  \cdots d\mathbf{p}_N \Theta \left(E - \frac{\mathbf{p}_1^2}{2m} \cdots - \frac{\mathbf{p}_N^2}{2m}\right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.43)

quantum

\begin{aligned}\gamma = \sum_i \Theta(E - \epsilon_i)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.44)

Ideal gas

\begin{aligned}\Omega = \frac{V^N}{N!} \frac{1}{{h^{3N}}} \frac{( 2 \pi m E)^{3 N/2 }}{E} \frac{1}{\Gamma( 3N/2 ) }\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.45)

\begin{aligned}S_{\mathrm{ideal}} = k_{\mathrm{B}} \left(N \ln \frac{V}{N} + \frac{3 N}{2} \ln \left( \frac{4 \pi m E }{3 N h^2}  \right) + \frac{5 N}{2} \right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.46)

Quantum free particle in a box

\begin{aligned}\Psi_{n_1, n_2, n_3}(x, y, z) = \left( \frac{2}{L} \right)^{3/2} \sin\left( \frac{ n_1 \pi x}{L}  \right)\sin\left( \frac{ n_2 \pi x}{L}  \right)\sin\left( \frac{ n_3 \pi x}{L}  \right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.47a)

\begin{aligned}\epsilon_{n_1, n_2, n_3} = \frac{h^2}{8 m L^2} \left( n_1^2 + n_2^2 + n_3^2  \right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.47b)

\begin{aligned}\epsilon_k = \frac{\hbar^2 k^2}{2m},\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.47b)

Spin

magnetization

\begin{aligned}\mu = \frac{\partial {F}}{\partial {B}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.48)

moment per particle

\begin{aligned}m = \mu/N\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.49)

spin matrices

\begin{aligned}\sigma_x = \begin{bmatrix} 0 & 1 \\ 1 & 0 \\ \end{bmatrix}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.50a)

\begin{aligned}\sigma_y = \begin{bmatrix} 0 & -i \\ i & 0 \\ \end{bmatrix}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.50b)

\begin{aligned}\sigma_z = \begin{bmatrix} 1 & 0 \\ 0 & -1 \\ \end{bmatrix}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.50c)

l \ge 0, -l \le m \le l

\begin{aligned}\mathbf{L}^2 {\left\lvert {lm} \right\rangle} = l(l+1)\hbar^2 {\left\lvert {lm} \right\rangle}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.51a)

\begin{aligned}L_z {\left\lvert {l m} \right\rangle} = \hbar m {\left\lvert {l m} \right\rangle}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.51b)

spin addition

\begin{aligned}S(S + 1) \hbar^2\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.51b)

Canonical ensemble

classical

\begin{aligned}\Omega(N, E) = \frac{ V }{ h^3 N} \int d\mathbf{p}_1 e^{\frac{S}{k_{\mathrm{B}}}(N, E)}e^{-\frac{1}{{k_{\mathrm{B}}}} \left( \frac{\partial {S}}{\partial {N}} \right)_{E, V} }e^{-\frac{\mathbf{p}_1^2}{2m k_{\mathrm{B}}}\left( \frac{\partial {S}}{\partial {E}} \right)_{N, V}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.53)

quantum

\begin{aligned}\Omega(E) \approx\sum_{m \in \text{subsystem}} e^{\frac{1}{{k_{\mathrm{B}}}} S(E)}e^{-\beta \mathcal{E}_m}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.54.54)

\begin{aligned}Z = \sum_m e^{-\beta \mathcal{E}_m} = \text{Tr} \left( e^{-\beta \hat{H}_{\text{subsystem}}}  \right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.54b)

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle = \frac{\int He^{- \beta H }}{\int e^{- \beta H }}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.55a)

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{E^2}}\right\rangle = \frac{\int H^2e^{- \beta H }}{\int e^{- \beta H }}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.55b)

\begin{aligned}Z \equiv \frac{1}{{h^{3N} N!}}\int e^{- \beta H }\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.55c)

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle = -\frac{1}{{Z}} \frac{\partial {Z}}{\partial {\beta}} = - \frac{\partial {\ln Z}}{\partial {\beta}} =\frac{\partial {(\beta F)}}{\partial {\beta}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.55d)

\begin{aligned}\sigma_{\mathrm{E}}^2= \left\langle{{E^2}}\right\rangle - \left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle^2 =\frac{\partial^2 {{\ln Z}}}{\partial {{\beta}}^2} = k_{\mathrm{B}} T^2 \frac{\partial {\left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle}}{\partial {T}}= k_{\mathrm{B}} T^2 C_{\mathrm{V}} \propto N\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.55e)

\begin{aligned}Z = e^{-\beta (\left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle - T S) } = e^{-\beta F}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.55f)

\begin{aligned}F = \left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle - T S = -k_{\mathrm{B}} T \ln Z\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.55g)

Grand Canonical ensemble

\begin{aligned}S = - k_{\mathrm{B}} \sum_{r,s} P_{r,s} \ln P_{r,s}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.56)

\begin{aligned}P_{r, s} = \frac{e^{-\alpha N_r - \beta E_s}}{Z_{\mathrm{G}}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.57a)

\begin{aligned}Z_{\mathrm{G}} = \sum_{r,s} e^{-\alpha N_r - \beta E_s} = \sum_{r,s} z^{N_r} e^{-\beta E_s} = \sum_{N_r} z^{N_r} Z_{N_r}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.57b)

\begin{aligned}z = e^{-\alpha} = e^{\mu \beta}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.57c)

\begin{aligned}q = \ln Z_{\mathrm{G}} = P V \beta\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.57d)

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{H}}\right\rangle = -\left({\partial {q}}/{\partial {\beta}}\right)_{{z,V}} = k_{\mathrm{B}} T^2 \left({\partial {q}}/{\partial {\mu}}\right)_{{z,V}} = \sum_\epsilon \frac{\epsilon}{z^{-1} e^{\beta \epsilon} \pm 1}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.57e)

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{N}}\right\rangle = z \left({\partial {q}}/{\partial {z}}\right)_{{V,T}} = \sum_\epsilon \frac{1}{{z^{-1} e^{\beta\epsilon} \pm 1}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.57f)

\begin{aligned}F = - k_{\mathrm{B}} T \ln \frac{ Z_{\mathrm{G}} }{z^N}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.57g)

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{n_\epsilon}}\right\rangle = -\frac{1}{{\beta}} \left({\partial {q}}/{\partial {\epsilon}}\right)_{{z, T, \text{other} \epsilon}} = \frac{1}{{z^{-1} e^{\beta \epsilon} \pm 1}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.57h)

\begin{aligned}\text{var}(N) = \frac{1}{{\beta}} \left({\partial {\left\langle{{N}}\right\rangle}}/{\partial {\mu}}\right)_{{V, T}} = - \frac{1}{{\beta}} \left({\partial {\left\langle{{n_\epsilon}}\right\rangle}}/{\partial {\epsilon}}\right)_{{z,T}} = z^{-1} e^{\beta \epsilon}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.57h)

\begin{aligned}\mathcal{P} \propto e^{\frac{\mu}{k_{\mathrm{B}} T} N_S}e^{-\frac{E_S}{k_{\mathrm{B}} T} }\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.59.59)

\begin{aligned}Z_{\mathrm{G}}= \sum_{N=0}^\infty e^{\beta \mu N}\sum_{n_k, \sum n_m = N} e^{-\beta \sum_m n_m \epsilon_m}=\prod_{k} \left( \sum_{n_k} e^{-\beta(\epsilon_k - \mu) n_k} \right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.59b)

\begin{aligned}Z_{\mathrm{G}}^{\mathrm{QM}} = {\text{Tr}}_{\{\text{energy}, N\}} \left( e^{ -\beta (\hat{H} - \mu \hat{N} ) }  \right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.59b)

\begin{aligned}P V = \frac{2}{3} U\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.60a)

\begin{aligned}f_\nu^\pm(z) = \frac{1}{{\Gamma(\nu)}} \int_0^\infty dx \frac{x^{\nu - 1}}{z^{-1} e^x \pm 1}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.60a)

\begin{aligned}f_\nu^\pm(z \approx 0) =z\mp\frac{z^{2}}{2^\nu}+\frac{z^{3}}{3^\nu}\mp\frac{z^{4}}{4^\nu}+  \cdots \end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.60a)

\begin{aligned}z \frac{d f_\nu^{\pm}(z) }{dz} = f_{\nu-1}^{\pm}(z)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.61)

\begin{aligned}\frac{d f_{3/2}^{\pm}(z) }{dT} = -\frac{3}{2T} f_{3/2}^{\pm}(z)f_{\nu-1}^{\pm}(z)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.62)

Fermions

\begin{aligned}\sum_{n_k = 0}^1 e^{-\beta(\epsilon_k - \mu) n_k}=1 + e^{-\beta(\epsilon_k - \mu)}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.62)

\begin{aligned}N = (2 S + 1) V \int_0^{k_{\mathrm{F}}} \frac{4 \pi k^2 dk}{(2 \pi)^3}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.64)

\begin{aligned}k_{\mathrm{F}} = \left( \frac{ 6 \pi^2 \rho }{2 S + 1} \right)^{1/3}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.65.65)

\begin{aligned}\epsilon_{\mathrm{F}} = \frac{\hbar^2}{2m} \left( \frac{6 \pi \rho}{2 S + 1} \right)^{2/3}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.65.65)

\begin{aligned}\mu = \epsilon_{\mathrm{F}} - \frac{\pi^2}{12} \frac{(k_{\mathrm{B}} T)^2}{\epsilon_{\mathrm{F}}} +  \cdots \end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.65.65)

\begin{aligned}\lambda \equiv \frac{h}{\sqrt{2 \pi m k_{\mathrm{B}} T}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.65.65)

\begin{aligned}\frac{N}{V}=\frac{g}{\lambda^3} f_{3/2}(z)=\frac{g}{\lambda^3} \left( e^{\beta \mu} - \frac{e^{2 \beta \mu}}{2^{3/2}} +  \cdots   \right) \end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.68)

(so n = \frac{g}{\lambda^3} e^{\beta \mu} for large temperatures)

\begin{aligned}P \beta = \frac{g}{\lambda^3} f_{5/2}(z)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.69a)

\begin{aligned}U= \frac{3}{2} N k_{\mathrm{B}} T \frac{f_{5/2}(z)}{f_{3/2}(z) }.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.69a)

\begin{aligned}f_\nu^+(e^y) \approx\frac{y^\nu}{\Gamma(\nu + 1)}\left( 1 + 2 \nu \sum_{j = 1, 3, 5,  \cdots } (\nu-1)  \cdots (\nu - j) \left( 1 - 2^{-j} \right) \frac{\zeta(j+1)}{ y^{j + 1} }  \right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.69a)

\begin{aligned}\frac{C}{N} = \frac{\pi^2}{2} k_{\mathrm{B}} \frac{ k_{\mathrm{B}} T}{\epsilon_{\mathrm{F}}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.71.71)

\begin{aligned}A = N k_{\mathrm{B}} T \left( \ln z - \frac{f_{5/2}(z)}{f_{3/2}(z)}  \right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.71.71)

Bosons

\begin{aligned}Z_{\mathrm{G}} = \prod_\epsilon \frac{1}{{ 1 - z e^{-\beta \epsilon} }}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.72)

\begin{aligned}P \beta = \frac{1}{{\lambda^3}} g_{5/2}(z)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.73)

\begin{aligned}U = \frac{3}{2} k_{\mathrm{B}} T \frac{V}{\lambda^3} g_{5/2}(z)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.74)

\begin{aligned}N_e = N - N_0 = N \left( \frac{T}{T_c}  \right)^{3/2}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.75)

For T < T_c, z = 1.

\begin{aligned}g_\nu(1) = \zeta(\nu).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.76)

\begin{aligned}\sum_{n_k = 0}^\infty e^{-\beta(\epsilon_k - \mu) n_k} =\frac{1}{{1 - e^{-\beta(\epsilon_k - \mu)}}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.76)

\begin{aligned}f_\nu^-( e^{-\alpha} ) = \frac{ \Gamma(1 - \nu)}{ \alpha^{1 - \nu} } +  \cdots \end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.76)

\begin{aligned}\rho \lambda^3 = g_{3/2}(z) \le \zeta(3/2) \approx 2.612\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.79.79)

\begin{aligned}k_{\mathrm{B}} T_{\mathrm{c}} = \left( \frac{\rho}{\zeta(3/2)}  \right)^{2/3} \frac{ 2 \pi \hbar^2}{m}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.79.79)

BEC

\begin{aligned}\rho= \rho_{\mathbf{k} = 0}+ \frac{1}{{\lambda^3}} g_{3/2}(z)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.80.80)

\begin{aligned}\rho_0 = \rho \left(1 - \left( \frac{T}{T_{\mathrm{c}}}  \right)^{3/2}\right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.80b)

\begin{aligned}\frac{E}{V} \propto \left( k_{\mathrm{B}} T \right)^{5/2}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.81.81)

\begin{aligned}\frac{C}{V} \propto \left( k_{\mathrm{B}} T \right)^{3/2}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.81.81)

\begin{aligned}\frac{S}{N k_{\mathrm{B}}} = \frac{5}{2} \frac{g_{5/2}}{g_{3/2}} - \ln z \Theta(T - T_c)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.81.81)

Density of states

Low velocities

\begin{aligned}N_1(\epsilon)=V \frac{m \hbar}{\hbar^2 \sqrt{ 2 m \epsilon}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.82a)

\begin{aligned}N_2(\epsilon)=V \frac{m}{\hbar^2}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.82b)

\begin{aligned}N_3(\epsilon)=V \left( \frac{2 m}{\hbar^2} \right)^{3/2} \frac{1}{{4 \pi^2}} \sqrt{\epsilon}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.82c)

relativistic

\begin{aligned}\mathcal{D}_1(\epsilon)=\frac{2 L}{ c h } \frac{ \sqrt{ \epsilon^2 - \left( m c^2  \right)^2} }{\epsilon}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.83.83)

\begin{aligned}\mathcal{D}_2(\epsilon)=\frac{2 \pi A}{ (c h)^2 } \frac{ \epsilon^2 - \left( m c^2  \right)^2 }{ \epsilon }\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.83.83)

\begin{aligned}\mathcal{D}_3(\epsilon)=\frac{4 \pi V}{ (c h)^3 } \frac{\left(	\epsilon^2 - \left( m c^2  \right)^2 \right)^{3/2}}{\epsilon}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.83.83)

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A final pre-exam update of my notes compilation for ‘PHY452H1S Basic Statistical Mechanics’, Taught by Prof. Arun Paramekanti

Posted by peeterjoot on April 22, 2013

Here’s my third update of my notes compilation for this course, including all of the following:

April 21, 2013 Fermi function expansion for thermodynamic quantities

April 20, 2013 Relativistic Fermi Gas

April 10, 2013 Non integral binomial coefficient

April 10, 2013 energy distribution around mean energy

April 09, 2013 Velocity volume element to momentum volume element

April 04, 2013 Phonon modes

April 03, 2013 BEC and phonons

April 03, 2013 Max entropy, fugacity, and Fermi gas

April 02, 2013 Bosons

April 02, 2013 Relativisitic density of states

March 28, 2013 Bosons

plus everything detailed in the description of my previous update and before.

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PHY452H1S Basic Statistical Mechanics. Problem Set 6: Max entropy, fugacity, and Fermi gas

Posted by peeterjoot on April 3, 2013

[Click here for a PDF of this post with nicer formatting (especially if my latex to wordpress script has left FORMULA DOES NOT PARSE errors.)]

Disclaimer

This is an ungraded set of answers to the problems posed.

Question: Maximum entropy principle

Consider the “Gibbs entropy”

\begin{aligned}S = - k_{\mathrm{B}} \sum_i p_i \ln p_i\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.1)

where p_i is the equilibrium probability of occurrence of a microstate i in the ensemble.

For a microcanonical ensemble with \Omega configurations (each having the same energy), assigning an equal probability p_i= 1/\Omega to each microstate leads to S = k_{\mathrm{B}} \ln \Omega. Show that this result follows from maximizing the Gibbs entropy with respect to the parameters p_i subject to the constraint of

\begin{aligned}\sum_i p_i = 1\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.2)

(for p_i to be meaningful as probabilities). In order to do the minimization with this constraint, use the method of Lagrange multipliers – first, do an unconstrained minimization of the function

\begin{aligned}S - \alpha \sum_i p_i,\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.3)

then fix \alpha by demanding that the constraint be satisfied.

For a canonical ensemble (no constraint on total energy, but all microstates having the same number of particles N), maximize the Gibbs entropy with respect to the parameters p_i subject to the constraint of

\begin{aligned}\sum_i p_i = 1,\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.4)

(for p_i to be meaningful as probabilities) and with a given fixed average energy

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle = \sum_i E_i p_i,\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.5)

where E_i is the energy of microstate i. Use the method of Lagrange multipliers, doing an unconstrained minimization of the function

\begin{aligned}S - \alpha \sum_i p_i - \beta \sum_i E_i p_i,\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.6)

then fix \alpha, \beta by demanding that the constraint be satisfied. What is the resulting p_i?

For a grand canonical ensemble (no constraint on total energy, or the number of particles), maximize the Gibbs entropy with respect to the parameters p_i subject to the constraint of

\begin{aligned}\sum_i p_i = 1,\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.7)

(for p_i to be meaningful as probabilities) and with a given fixed average energy

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle = \sum_i E_i p_i,\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.8)

and a given fixed average particle number

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{N}}\right\rangle = \sum_i N_i p_i.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.9)

Here E_i, N_i represent the energy and number of particles in microstate i. Use the method of Lagrange multipliers, doing an unconstrained minimization of the function

\begin{aligned}S - \alpha \sum_i p_i - \beta \sum_i E_i p_i - \gamma \sum_i N_i p_i,\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.10)

then fix \alpha, \beta, \gamma by demanding that the constrains be satisfied. What is the resulting p_i?

Answer

Writing

\begin{aligned}f = S - \alpha \sum_{j = 1}^\Omega p_j,= -\sum_{j = 1}^\Omega p_j \left( k_{\mathrm{B}} \ln p_j + \alpha  \right),\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.11)

our unconstrained minimization requires

\begin{aligned}0 = \frac{\partial {f}}{\partial {p_i}}= -\left( k_{\mathrm{B}} \left( \ln p_i + 1  \right) + \alpha  \right).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.12)

Solving for p_i we have

\begin{aligned}p_i = e^{-\alpha/k_{\mathrm{B}} - 1}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.13)

The probabilities for each state are constant. To fix that constant we employ our constraint

\begin{aligned}1 = \sum_{j = 1}^\Omega p_j= \sum_{j = 1}^\Omega e^{-\alpha/k_{\mathrm{B}} - 1}= \Omega e^{-\alpha/k_{\mathrm{B}} - 1},\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.14)

or

\begin{aligned}\alpha/k_{\mathrm{B}} + 1 = \ln \Omega.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.15)

Inserting eq. 1.15 fixes the probability, giving us the first of the expected results

\begin{aligned}\boxed{p_i = e^{-\ln \Omega} = \frac{1}{{\Omega}}.}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

Using this we our Gibbs entropy can be summed easily

\begin{aligned}S &= -k_{\mathrm{B}} \sum_{j = 1}^\Omega p_j \ln p_j \\ &= -k_{\mathrm{B}} \sum_{j = 1}^\Omega \frac{1}{{\Omega}} \ln \frac{1}{{\Omega}} \\ &= -k_{\mathrm{B}} \frac{\Omega}{\Omega} \left( -\ln \Omega  \right),\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

or

\begin{aligned}\boxed{S = k_{\mathrm{B}} \ln \Omega.}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

For the “action” like quantity that we want to minimize, let’s write

\begin{aligned}f = S - \alpha \sum_j p_j - \beta \sum_j E_j p_j,\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

for which we seek \alpha, \beta such that

\begin{aligned}0 &= \frac{\partial {f}}{\partial {p_i}} \\ &= -\frac{\partial {}}{\partial {p_i}}\sum_j p_j\left( k_{\mathrm{B}} \ln p_j + \alpha + \beta E_j  \right) \\ &= -k_{\mathrm{B}} (\ln p_i + 1) - \alpha - \beta E_i,\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

or

\begin{aligned}p_i = \exp\left( - \left( \alpha - \beta E_i \right) /k_{\mathrm{B}} - 1  \right).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

Our probability constraint is

\begin{aligned}1 &= \sum_j \exp\left( - \left( \alpha - \beta E_j \right) /k_{\mathrm{B}} - 1  \right) \\ &= \exp\left( - \alpha/k_{\mathrm{B}} - 1  \right)\sum_j \exp\left( - \beta E_j/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right),\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

or

\begin{aligned}\exp\left( \alpha/k_{\mathrm{B}} + 1  \right)=\sum_j \exp\left( - \beta E_j/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

Taking logs we have

\begin{aligned}\alpha/k_{\mathrm{B}} + 1 = \ln \sum_j \exp\left( - \beta E_j/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

We could continue to solve for \alpha explicitly but don’t care any more than this. Plugging back into the probability eq. 1.0.16 obtained from the unconstrained minimization we have

\begin{aligned}p_i = \exp\left( -\ln \sum_j \exp\left( - \beta E_j/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right)  \right)\exp\left( - \beta E_i/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right),\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

or

\begin{aligned}\boxed{p_i = \frac{   \exp\left( - \beta E_i/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right)}{   \sum_j    \exp\left( - \beta E_j/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right)}.}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

To determine \beta we must look implicitly to the energy constraint, which is

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle &= \sum_i E_i p_i \\ &= \sum_iE_i\left( \frac{ \exp\left( - \beta E_i/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right) } { \sum_j \exp\left( - \beta E_j/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right) }  \right),\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

or

\begin{aligned}\boxed{\left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle = \frac{   \sum_i E_i \exp\left( - \beta E_i/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right)}{   \sum_j \exp\left( - \beta E_j/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right)}.}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

The constraint \beta (=1/T) is given implicitly by this energy constraint.

Again write

\begin{aligned}f = S - \alpha \sum_j p_j - \beta \sum_j E_j p_j - \gamma \sum_j N_j p_j.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

The unconstrained minimization requires

\begin{aligned}0 &= \frac{\partial {f}}{\partial {p_i}} \\ &= -\frac{\partial {}}{\partial {p_i}}\left( k_{\mathrm{B}} (\ln p_i + 1) + \alpha + \beta E_i + \gamma N_i  \right),\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

or

\begin{aligned}p_i = \exp\left( -\alpha/k_{\mathrm{B}} - 1  \right) \exp\left( -(\beta E_i + \gamma N_i)/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

The unit probability constraint requires

\begin{aligned}1 &= \sum_j p_j \\ &= \exp\left( -\alpha/k_{\mathrm{B}} - 1  \right) \sum_j\exp\left( -(\beta E_j + \gamma N_j)/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right),\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

or

\begin{aligned}\exp\left( -\alpha/k_{\mathrm{B}} - 1  \right) =\frac{1}{{\sum_j\exp\left( -(\beta E_j + \gamma N_j)/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right)}}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

Our probability is then

\begin{aligned}\boxed{p_i = \frac{\exp\left( -(\beta E_i + \gamma N_i)/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right)}{\sum_j\exp\left( -(\beta E_j + \gamma N_j)/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right)}.}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.16)

The average energy \left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle = \sum_j p_j E_j and average number of particles \left\langle{{N}}\right\rangle = \sum_j p_j N_j are given by

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle = \frac{E_i\exp\left( -(\beta E_i + \gamma N_i)/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right)}{\sum_j\exp\left( -(\beta E_j + \gamma N_j)/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right)}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.35.35)

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{N}}\right\rangle = \frac{N_i\exp\left( -(\beta E_i + \gamma N_i)/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right)}{\sum_j\exp\left( -(\beta E_j + \gamma N_j)/k_{\mathrm{B}}  \right)}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.35.35)

The values \beta and \gamma are fixed implicitly by requiring simultaneous solutions of these equations.

Question: Fugacity expansion ([3] Pathria, Appendix D, E)

The theory of the ideal Fermi or Bose gases often involves integrals of the form

\begin{aligned}f_\nu^\pm(z) = \frac{1}{{\Gamma(\nu)}} \int_0^\infty dx \frac{x^{\nu - 1}}{z^{-1} e^x \pm 1}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.36)

where

\begin{aligned}\Gamma(\nu) = \int_0^\infty dy y^{\nu-1} e^{-y}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.37)

denotes the gamma function.

Obtain the behavior of f_\nu^\pm(z) for z \rightarrow 0 keeping the two leading terms in the expansion.

For Fermions, obtain the behavior of f_\nu^\pm(z) for z \rightarrow \infty again keeping the two leading terms.

For Bosons, we must have z \le 1 (why?), obtain the leading term of f_\nu^-(z) for z \rightarrow 1.

Answer

For z \rightarrow 0 we can rewrite the integrand in a form that allows for series expansion

\begin{aligned}\frac{x^{\nu - 1}}{z^{-1} e^x \pm 1} &= \frac{z e^{-x} x^{\nu - 1}}{1 \pm z e^{-x}} \\ &= z e^{-x} x^{\nu - 1}\left( 1 \mp z e^{-x} + (z e^{-x})^2 \mp (z e^{-x})^3 + \cdots  \right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.38)

For the kth power of z e^{-x} in this series our integral is

\begin{aligned}\int_0^\infty dx z e^{-x} x^{\nu - 1} (z e^{-x})^k &= z^{k+1}\int_0^\infty dx x^{\nu - 1} e^{-(k + 1) x} \\ &= \frac{z^{k+1}}{(k+1)^\nu}\int_0^\infty du u^{\nu - 1} e^{- u} \\ &= \frac{z^{k+1}}{(k+1)^\nu} \Gamma(\nu)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.39)

Putting everything back together we have for small z

\begin{aligned}\boxed{f_\nu^\pm(z) =z\mp\frac{z^{2}}{2^\nu}+\frac{z^{3}}{3^\nu}\mp\frac{z^{4}}{4^\nu}+ \cdots}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.40)

We’ll expand \Gamma(\nu) f_\nu^+(e^y) about z = e^y, writing

\begin{aligned}F_\nu(e^y) &= \Gamma(\nu) f_\nu^+(e^y) \\ &= \int_0^\infty dx \frac{x^{\nu - 1}}{e^{x - y} + 1} \\ &= \int_0^y dx \frac{x^{\nu - 1}}{e^{x - y} + 1}+\int_y^\infty dx \frac{x^{\nu - 1}}{e^{x - y} + 1}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.41)

The integral has been split into two since the behavior of the exponential in the denominator is quite different in the x  y ranges. Observe that in the first integral we have

\begin{aligned}\frac{1}{{2}} \le \frac{1}{e^{x - y} + 1} \le \frac{1}{{1 + e^{-y}}}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

Since this term is of order 1, let’s consider the difference of this from 1, writing

\begin{aligned}\frac{1}{e^{x - y} + 1} = 1 + u,\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

or

\begin{aligned}u = \frac{1}{e^{x - y} + 1} - 1 &= \frac{1 -(e^{x - y} + 1)}{e^{x - y} + 1} \\ &= \frac{-e^{x - y} }{e^{x - y} + 1} \\ &= -\frac{1}{1 + e^{y - x}}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

This gives us

\begin{aligned}F_\nu(e^y) &= \int_0^y dx x^{\nu - 1} \left( 1 - \frac{ 1 } { 1 + e^{y - x} }  \right)+\int_y^\infty dx \frac{x^{\nu - 1}}{e^{x - y} + 1} \\ &= \frac{y^\nu}{\nu}-\int_0^y dx \frac{ x^{\nu - 1}  } { 1 + e^{y - x} }+\int_y^\infty dx \frac{x^{\nu - 1}}{e^{x - y} + 1}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

Now let’s make a change of variables a = y - x in the first integral and b = x - y in the second. This gives

\begin{aligned}F_\nu(e^y) = \frac{y^\nu}{\nu}-\int_0^\infty da \frac{ (y - a)^{\nu - 1}  } { 1 + e^{a} }+\int_0^\infty db \frac{(y + b)^{\nu - 1}}{e^{b} + 1}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

As a gets large in the first integral the integrand is approximately e^{-a} (y-a)^{\nu -1}. The exponential dominates this integrand. Since we are considering large y, we can approximate the upper bound of the integral by extending it to \infty. Also expanding in series we have

\begin{aligned}F_\nu(e^y)  &\approx \frac{y^\nu}{\nu}+\int_0^\infty da \frac{ (y + a)^{\nu - 1} -(y - a)^{\nu - 1}  } { 1 + e^{a} } \\ &= \frac{y^\nu}{\nu}+\int_0^\infty da \frac{1}{{e^a + 1}}\left( \left( \frac{1}{{0!}} y^{\nu-1} a^0 + \frac{1}{{1!}} (\nu-1) y^{\nu-2} a^1 + \frac{1}{{2!}} (\nu-1) (\nu-2) y^{\nu-3} a^2 + \cdots  \right) - \left( \frac{1}{{0!}} y^{\nu-1} (-a)^0 + \frac{1}{{1!}} (\nu-1) y^{\nu-2} (-a)^1 + \frac{1}{{2!}} (\nu-1) (\nu-2) y^{\nu-3} (-a)^2 + \cdots  \right)  \right) \\ &= \frac{y^\nu}{\nu}+ 2\int_0^\infty da \frac{1}{{e^a + 1}}   \left( \frac{1}{{1!}} (\nu-1) y^{\nu-2} a^1 + \frac{1}{{3!}} (\nu-1) (\nu-2) (\nu - 3)y^{\nu-4} a^3 + \cdots  \right) \\ &= \frac{y^\nu}{\nu}+ 2\sum_{j = 1, 3, 5, \cdots} \frac{y^{\nu - 1 - j}}{j!} \left( \prod_{k = 1}^j (\nu-k)  \right)\int_0^\infty da \frac{a^j}{e^a + 1} \\ &= \frac{y^\nu}{\nu}+ 2\sum_{j = 1, 3, 5, \cdots} \frac{y^{\nu - 1 - j}}{j!} \frac{ \Gamma(\nu) } {\Gamma(\nu - j)}\int_0^\infty da \frac{a^j}{e^a + 1}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

For the remaining integral, Mathematica gives

\begin{aligned}\int_0^\infty da \frac{a^j}{e^a + 1}=\left( 1 - 2^{-j} \right) j! \zeta (j+1),\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

where for s > 1

\begin{aligned}\zeta(s) = \sum_{k=1}^{\infty} k^{-s}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

This gives

\begin{aligned}F_\nu(e^y)  \approx \frac{y^\nu}{\nu}+ 2\sum_{j = 1, 3, 5, \cdots} y^{\nu - 1 - j}\frac{ \Gamma(\nu) } {\Gamma(\nu - j)}\left( 1 - 2^{-j} \right) \zeta(j+1),\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

or

\begin{aligned}f_\nu^+(e^y)  &\approx y^\nu\left( \frac{1}{\nu \Gamma(\nu)} + 2 \sum_{j = 1, 3, 5, \cdots} \frac{ 1 } {\Gamma(\nu - j) y^{j + 1} } \left( 1 - 2^{-j} \right) \zeta(j+1)  \right) \\ &= \frac{y^\nu}{\Gamma(\nu + 1)}\left( 1 + 2 \sum_{j = 1, 3, 5, \cdots} \frac{ \Gamma(\nu + 1) } {\Gamma(\nu - j) } \left( 1 - 2^{-j} \right) \frac{\zeta(j+1)}{ y^{j + 1} }  \right),\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

or

\begin{aligned}\boxed{f_\nu^+(e^y)  \approx \frac{y^\nu}{\Gamma(\nu + 1)}\left( 1 + 2 \nu \sum_{j = 1, 3, 5, \cdots} (\nu-1) \cdots(\nu - j) \left( 1 - 2^{-j} \right) \frac{\zeta(j+1)}{ y^{j + 1} }  \right).}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

Evaluating the numerical portions explicitly, with

\begin{aligned}c(j) = 2 \left(1-2^{-j}\right) \zeta (j+1),\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

\begin{aligned}\begin{aligned}c(1) &= \frac{\pi^2}{6} \\ c(3) &= \frac{7 \pi^4}{360} \\ c(5) &= \frac{31 \pi^6}{15120} \\ c(7) &= \frac{127 \pi^8}{604800},\end{aligned}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

so to two terms (j = 1, 3), we have

\begin{aligned}\boxed{f_\nu^+(e^y)  \approx \frac{y^\nu}{\Gamma(\nu + 1)}\left( 1 + \nu(\nu-1) \frac{\pi^2}{6 y^{2}} + \nu(\nu-1)(\nu-2)(\nu -3) \frac{7 \pi^4}{360 y^4}  \right).}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

In order for the Boson occupation numbers to be non-singular we require \mu less than all \epsilon. If that lowest energy level is set to zero, this is equivalent to z < 1. Given this restriction, a z = e^{-\alpha} substitution is convenient for investigation of the z \rightarrow 1 case. Following the text, we'll write

\begin{aligned}G_\nu(e^{-\alpha})=\Gamma(\nu)f_\nu^-(e^{-\alpha}) = \int_0^\infty dx \frac{x^{\nu - 1}}{e^{x + \alpha} - 1}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

For \nu = 1, this is integrable

\begin{aligned}\frac{d}{dx} \ln\left( 1 - e^{-x - \alpha}  \right) &= \frac{e^{-x - \alpha}}{ 1 - e^{-x - \alpha} } \\ &= \frac{1}{{ e^{x + \alpha} - 1}},\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

so that

\begin{aligned}G_1(e^{-\alpha}) &= \int_0^\infty dx \frac{1}{e^{x + \alpha} - 1} \\ &= {\ln \left( 1 - e^{-x - \alpha}  \right)}_{0}^{\infty} \\ &= \ln 1 - \ln \left( 1 - e^{- \alpha}  \right) \\ &= -\ln \left( 1 - e^{- \alpha}  \right).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

Taylor expanding 1 - e^{-\alpha} we have

\begin{aligned}1 - e^{-\alpha} = 1 - \left( 1 - \alpha + \alpha^2/2 - \cdots \right).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

Noting that \Gamma(1) = 1, we have for the limit

\begin{aligned}\lim_{\alpha \rightarrow 0} G_1(e^{-\alpha}) \rightarrow - \ln \alpha,\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

or

\begin{aligned}\lim_{z\rightarrow 1} f_\nu^-(z)= -\ln (-\ln z).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

For values of \nu \ne 1, the denominator is

\begin{aligned}e^{\alpha + x} - 1 = (\alpha + x) + (\alpha + x)^2/2 + \cdots\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

To first order this gives us

\begin{aligned}f_\nu^-( e^{-\alpha} ) \approx \frac{1}{{\Gamma(\nu)}} \int_0^\infty dx \frac{1}{x + \alpha}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

Of this integral Mathematica says it can be evaluated for 0 < \nu < 1, and has the value

\begin{aligned}\frac{1}{{\Gamma(\nu)}} \int_0^\infty dx \frac{1}{x + \alpha}=\frac{\pi}{\sin(\pi\nu)} \frac{1}{\alpha^{1 - \nu} \Gamma (\nu )}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

From [1] 6.1.17 we find

\begin{aligned}\Gamma(z) \Gamma(1-z) = \frac{\pi}{\sin(\pi z)},\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

with which we can write

\begin{aligned}\boxed{f_\nu^-( e^{-\alpha} ) \approx \frac{ \Gamma(1 - \nu)}{ \alpha^{1 - \nu} }.}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.42)

Question: Nuclear matter ([2], prob 9.2)

Consider a heavy nucleus of mass number A. i.e., having A total nucleons including neutrons and protons. Assume that the number of neutrons and protons is equal, and recall that each of them has spin-1/2 (so possessing two spin states). Treating these nucleons as a free ideal Fermi gas of uniform density contained in a radius R = r_0 A^{1/3}, where r_0 = 1.4 \times 10^{-13} \text{cm}, calculate the Fermi energy and the average energy per nucleon in MeV.

Answer

Our nucleon particle density is

\begin{aligned}\rho &= \frac{N}{V} \\ &= \frac{A}{\frac{4 \pi}{3} R^3} \\ &= \frac{3 A}{4 \pi r_0^3 A} \\ &= \frac{3}{4 \pi r_0^3} \\ &= \frac{3}{4 \pi (1.4 \times 10^{-13} \text{cm})^3} \\ &= 8.7 \times 10^{37} (\text{cm})^{-3} \\ &= 8.7 \times 10^{43} (\text{m})^{-3}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.67)

With m for the mass of either the proton or the neutron, and \rho_m = \rho_p = \rho/2, the Fermi energy for these particles is

\begin{aligned}\epsilon_{\mathrm{F}} = \frac{\hbar^2}{2m} \left( \frac{6 \pi (\rho/2)}{2 S + 1} \right)^{2/3},\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.68)

With S = 1/2, and 2 S + 1 = 2(1/2) + 1 = 2 for either the proton or the neutron, this is

\begin{aligned}\epsilon_{\mathrm{F}} = \frac{\hbar^2}{2 m} \left( \frac{3 \pi^2 \rho}{2} \right)^{2/3}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.69)

\begin{aligned}\begin{aligned}\hbar &= 1.05 \times 10^{-34} \,\text{m^2 kg s^{-1}} \\ m &= 1.67 \times 10^{-27} \,\text{kg}\end{aligned}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.70)

This gives us

\begin{aligned}\epsilon_{\mathrm{F}} &= \frac{(1.05 \times 10^{-34})^2}{2 \times 1.67 \times 10^{-27}} \left( \frac{3 \pi^2 }{2} \frac{8.7 \times 10^{43} }{2}  \right)^{2/3}\text{m}^4 \frac{\text{kg}^2}{s^2} \frac{1}{{\text{kg}}} \frac{1}{{\text{m}^2}} \\ &= 3.9 \times 10^{-12} \,\text{J} \times \left( 6.241509 \times 10^{12} \frac{\text{MeV}}{J} \right) \approx 24 \text{MeV}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.71)

In lecture 16

we found that the total average energy for a Fermion gas of N particles was

\begin{aligned}E = \frac{3}{5} N \epsilon_{\mathrm{F}},\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.72)

so the average energy per nucleon is approximately

\begin{aligned}\frac{3}{5} \epsilon_{\mathrm{F}}  \approx  15 \,\text{MeV}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.73)

Question: Neutron star ([2], prob 9.5)

Model a neutron star as an ideal Fermi gas of neutrons at T = 0 moving in the gravitational field of a heavy point mass M at the center. Show that the pressure P obeys the equation

\begin{aligned}\frac{dP}{dr} = - \gamma M \frac{\rho(r)}{r^2},\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.74)

where \gamma is the gravitational constant, r is the distance from the center, and \rho(r) is the density which only depends on distance from the center.

Answer

In the grand canonical scheme the pressure for a Fermion system is given by

\begin{aligned}\beta P V &= \ln Z_{\mathrm{G}} \\ &= \ln \prod_\epsilon \sum_{n = 0}^1 \left( z e^{-\beta \epsilon}  \right)^n \\ &= \sum_\epsilon \ln \left( 1 + z e^{-\beta \epsilon}  \right).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.75)

The kinetic energy of the particle is adjusted by the gravitational potential

\begin{aligned}\epsilon &= \epsilon_\mathbf{k}- \frac{\gamma m M}{r} \\ &= \frac{\hbar^2 \mathbf{k}^2}{2m}- \frac{\gamma m M}{r}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.76)

Differentiating eq. 1.75 with respect to the radius, we have

\begin{aligned}\beta V \frac{\partial {P}}{\partial {r}} &= -\beta \frac{\partial {\epsilon}}{\partial {r}}\sum_\epsilon \frac{z e^{-\beta \epsilon}}{ 1 + z e^{-\beta \epsilon} } \\ &= -\beta\left( \frac{\gamma m M}{r^2}  \right)\sum_\epsilon \frac{1}{ z^{-1} e^{\beta \epsilon} + 1} \\ &= -\beta\left( \frac{\gamma m M}{r^2}  \right)\left\langle{{N}}\right\rangle.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.77)

Noting that \left\langle{{N}}\right\rangle m/V is the average density of the particles, presumed radial, we have

\begin{aligned}\boxed{\frac{\partial P}{\partial r} &= -\frac{\gamma M}{r^2} \frac{m \left\langle N \right\rangle}{V} \\ &= -\frac{\gamma M}{r^2} \rho(r).}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.78)

References

[1] M. Abramowitz and I.A. Stegun. \emph{Handbook of mathematical functions with formulas, graphs, and mathematical tables}, volume 55. Dover publications, 1964.

[2] Kerson Huang. Introduction to statistical physics. CRC Press, 2001.

[3] RK Pathria. Statistical mechanics. Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford, UK, 1996.

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An updated compilation of notes, for ‘PHY452H1S Basic Statistical Mechanics’, Taught by Prof. Arun Paramekanti

Posted by peeterjoot on March 27, 2013

Here’s my second update of my notes compilation for this course, including all of the following:

March 27, 2013 Fermi gas

March 26, 2013 Fermi gas thermodynamics

March 26, 2013 Fermi gas thermodynamics

March 23, 2013 Relativisitic generalization of statistical mechanics

March 21, 2013 Kittel Zipper problem

March 18, 2013 Pathria chapter 4 diatomic molecule problem

March 17, 2013 Gibbs sum for a two level system

March 16, 2013 open system variance of N

March 16, 2013 probability forms of entropy

March 14, 2013 Grand Canonical/Fermion-Bosons

March 13, 2013 Quantum anharmonic oscillator

March 12, 2013 Grand canonical ensemble

March 11, 2013 Heat capacity of perturbed harmonic oscillator

March 10, 2013 Langevin small approximation

March 10, 2013 Addition of two one half spins

March 10, 2013 Midterm II reflection

March 07, 2013 Thermodynamic identities

March 06, 2013 Temperature

March 05, 2013 Interacting spin

plus everything detailed in the description of my first update and before.

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PHY452H1S Basic Statistical Mechanics. Lecture 14: Grand canonical ensemble. Taught by Prof. Arun Paramekanti

Posted by peeterjoot on March 13, 2013

[Click here for a PDF of this post with nicer formatting (especially if my latex to wordpress script has left FORMULA DOES NOT PARSE errors.)]

Disclaimer

Peeter’s lecture notes from class. May not be entirely coherent.

This lecture had a large amount of spoken content not captured in these notes. Reference to section 4 [1] was made for additional details.

Grand canonical ensemble

Fig 1.1: Ensemble pictures

We are now going to allow particles to move to and from the system and the reservoir. The total number of states in the system is

\begin{aligned}\Omega_tot (N, V, E) =\sum_{N_S, E_S} \Omega_S(N_S, V_S, E_S)\Omega_R(N - N_S, V_R, E - E_S),\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.2.1)

so for N_S \ll N, and E_S \ll E, we have

\begin{aligned}\Omega_R &= \exp\left( \frac{1}{{k_{\mathrm{B}}}} S_R(N- N_S, V_R, E - E_S) \right) \\ &\approx \exp\left( \frac{1}{{k_{\mathrm{B}}}} S_R(N, V_R, E) - \frac{N_S}{k_{\mathrm{B}}} \left({\partial {S_R}}/{\partial {N}}\right)_{{V, E}} - \frac{E_S}{k_{\mathrm{B}}} \left({\partial {S_R}}/{\partial {E}}\right)_{{N, V}}  \right) \\ &\propto \Omega_S(N_S, V_S, E_S)e^{-\frac{\mu}{k_{\mathrm{B}} T} N_S}e^{-\frac{E_S}{k_{\mathrm{B}} T} },\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.2.2)

where the chemical potential \index{chemical potential} and temperature \index{temperature} are defined respectively as

\begin{aligned}\frac{\mu}{T} = -\left({\partial {S_R}}/{\partial {N}}\right)_{{V,E}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.3a)

\begin{aligned}\frac{1}{T} = \left({\partial {S_R}}/{\partial {E}}\right)_{{N,V}}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.3b)

\begin{aligned}\mathcal{P} \propto e^{\frac{\mu}{k_{\mathrm{B}} T} N_S}e^{-\frac{E_S}{k_{\mathrm{B}} T} }.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.4)

With \{c\} as the set of all possible configuration pairs \{N_S, E_S\}, we define the grand partition function

\begin{aligned}Z_{\mathrm{G}} = \sum_{\{c\}}e^{\frac{\mu}{k_{\mathrm{B}} T} N_S}e^{-\frac{E_S}{k_{\mathrm{B}} T} }.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.5)

So that the probability of finding a given state with energy and particle numbers \{E_S, N_S\} is

\begin{aligned}\mathcal{P}(E_S, N_S) = \frac{e^{\frac{\mu}{k_{\mathrm{B}} T} N_S}e^{-\frac{E_S}{k_{\mathrm{B}} T} }}{Z_{\mathrm{G}}}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.6)

For a classical system we have

\begin{aligned}\{ c \} \rightarrow \{ x \} \{ p \},\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.7)

whereas in a quantum content we have

\begin{aligned}\{ c \} \rightarrow \text{eigenstate}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.8)

\begin{aligned}Z_{\mathrm{G}}^{\mathrm{\mathrm{\mathrm{QM}}}} = {\text{Tr}}_{\{\text{energy}, N\}} \left( e^{ -\beta (\hat{H} - \mu \hat{N} } \right).\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.9)

We want to do this because the calculation of the number of states

\begin{aligned}\int_{\{ x \} \{ p \}} \delta\left( \frac{p_1^2}{2m} + \frac{p_2^2}{2m} + \cdots + m g x_1 + m g x_2 + \cdots \right),\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.10)

can quickly become intractable. We want to go to the canonical ensemble was because the partition function

\begin{aligned}Z_c = \int_{\{ x \} \{ p \}}e^{-\beta \left( \frac{p_1^2}{2m} + \frac{p_2^2}{2m} + \cdots + m g x_1 + m g x_2 + \cdots \right)},\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.11)

yields the same results, but can be much easier to compute. We have a similar reason to go to the grand canonical ensemble, because this computation, once we allow the number of particles to vary also becomes very hard.

We are now going to define a notion of equilibrium so that it includes

  1. All forces are equal (mechanical equilibrium)
  2. Temperatures are equal (no net heat flow)
  3. Chemical potentials are equal (no net particle flow)

We’ll isolate a subsystem, containing a large number of particles fig. 1.2.

Fig 1.2: A subsystem to and from which particle motion is allowed

When we think about Fermions we have to respect the “Pauli exclusion” principle \index{Pauli exclusion principle}.

Suppose we have just a one dimensional Fermion system for some potential as in fig. 1.3.

Fig 1.3: Energy level filling in a quantum system

For every momentum k there are two possible occupation numbers n_k \in \{0, 1\}

our partition function is

\begin{aligned}Z_c = \sum_{n_k,\sum_k n_k = N} e^{-\beta \sum_k \epsilon_k n_k}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.0.12)

We’d find that this calculation with this \sum_k n_k = N constraint becomes essentially impossible.

We’ll see that relaxing this constraint will allow this calculation to become tractable.

References

[1] RK Pathria. Statistical mechanics. Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford, UK, 1996.

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An updated compilation of notes, for ‘PHY452H1S Basic Statistical Mechanics’, Taught by Prof. Arun Paramekanti

Posted by peeterjoot on March 3, 2013

In A compilation of notes, so far, for ‘PHY452H1S Basic Statistical Mechanics’ I posted a link this compilation of statistical mechanics course notes.

That compilation now all of the following too (no further updates will be made to any of these) :

February 28, 2013 Rotation of diatomic molecules

February 28, 2013 Helmholtz free energy

February 26, 2013 Statistical and thermodynamic connection

February 24, 2013 Ideal gas

February 16, 2013 One dimensional well problem from Pathria chapter II

February 15, 2013 1D pendulum problem in phase space

February 14, 2013 Continuing review of thermodynamics

February 13, 2013 Lightning review of thermodynamics

February 11, 2013 Cartesian to spherical change of variables in 3d phase space

February 10, 2013 n SHO particle phase space volume

February 10, 2013 Change of variables in 2d phase space

February 10, 2013 Some problems from Kittel chapter 3

February 07, 2013 Midterm review, thermodynamics

February 06, 2013 Limit of unfair coin distribution, the hard way

February 05, 2013 Ideal gas and SHO phase space volume calculations

February 03, 2013 One dimensional random walk

February 02, 2013 1D SHO phase space

February 02, 2013 Application of the central limit theorem to a product of random vars

January 31, 2013 Liouville’s theorem questions on density and current

January 30, 2013 State counting

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PHY452H1S Basic Statistical Mechanics. Lecture 11: Statistical and thermodynamic connection. Taught by Prof.\ Arun Paramekanti

Posted by peeterjoot on February 27, 2013

[Click here for a PDF of this post with nicer formatting]

Disclaimer

Peeter’s lecture notes from class. May not be entirely coherent.

Connections between statistical and thermodynamic views

  • “Heat”. Disorganized energy.
  • S_{\text{Statistical entropy}}. This is the thermodynamic entropy introduced by Boltzmann (microscopic).

Ideal gas

\begin{aligned}H = \sum_{i = 1}^N \frac{\mathbf{p}_i^2}{2m}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.3.1)

\begin{aligned}\Omega(E) = \frac{1}{{h^{3N} N!}}\int d\mathbf{x}_1 d\mathbf{x}_2  \cdots  d\mathbf{x}_Nd\mathbf{p}_1 d\mathbf{p}_2  \cdots  d\mathbf{p}_N\delta( E - H )\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.3.2)

Let’s isolate the contribution of the Hamiltonian from a single particle and all the rest

\begin{aligned}H = \frac{\mathbf{p}_1^2}{2m}+\sum_{i \ne 1}^N \frac{\mathbf{p}_i^2}{2m}=\frac{\mathbf{p}_1^2}{2m}+H'\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.3.3)

so that the number of states in the phase space volume in the phase space region associated with the energy is

\begin{aligned}\Omega(N, E) &= \frac{V^N}{h^{3N} N!}\int d\mathbf{p}_1\int d\mathbf{p}_2 d\mathbf{p}_3 \cdots d\mathbf{p}_N\delta( E - H' - H_1) \\ &= \frac{V^{N-1}}{h^{3(N-1)} (N-1)!} \frac{V}{h^3 N}\int d\mathbf{p}_1\int d\mathbf{p}_2 d\mathbf{p}_3 \cdots d\mathbf{p}_N\delta( E - H' - H_1) \\ &= \frac{ V }{ h^3 N} \int d\mathbf{p}_1 \Omega( N-1, E - H_1 )\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.3.4)

With entropy defined by

\begin{aligned}S = k_{\mathrm{B}} \ln \Omega,\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.3.5)

we have

\begin{aligned}\Omega( N-1, E - H_1 ) = \exp\left(  \frac{1}{k_{\mathrm{B}}} S \left( N-1, E - \frac{\mathbf{p}_1^2}{2m} \right)  \right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.3.6)

so that

\begin{aligned}\Omega(N, E) =\frac{ V }{ h^3 N} \int d\mathbf{p}_1 \exp\left(  \frac{1}{k_{\mathrm{B}}} S \left( N-1, E - \frac{\mathbf{p}_1^2}{2m} \right)  \right)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.3.7)

For N \gg 1 and E \gg \mathbf{p}_1^2/2m, the exponential can be approximated by

\begin{aligned}\exp\left(  \frac{1}{k_{\mathrm{B}}} S \left( N-1, E - \frac{\mathbf{p}_1^2}{2m} \right)  \right)= \exp\left(  \frac{1}{k_{\mathrm{B}}} \left(  S(N, E) - \left( \frac{\partial {S}}{\partial {N}} \right)_{E, V} - \frac{\mathbf{p}_1^2}{2m} \left( \frac{\partial {S}}{\partial {E}} \right)_{N, V}  \right)  \right),\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.3.8)

so that

\begin{aligned}\Omega(N, E) = \underbrace{\frac{ V }{ h^3 N} \int d\mathbf{p}_1 e^{\frac{S}{k_{\mathrm{B}}}(N, E)}e^{-\frac{1}{{k_{\mathrm{B}}}}\left( \frac{\partial {S}}{\partial {N}} \right)_{E, V}}}_{B}\int d\mathbf{p}_1 e^{-\frac{\mathbf{p}_1^2}{2m k_{\mathrm{B}}}\left( \frac{\partial {S}}{\partial {E}} \right)_{N, V}}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.3.9)

or

\begin{aligned}\Omega(N, E) = B\int d\mathbf{p}_1 e^{-\frac{\mathbf{p}_1^2}{2m k_{\mathrm{B}}}\left( \frac{\partial {S}}{\partial {E}} \right)_{N, V}}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.3.10)

\begin{aligned}\mathcal{P}(\mathbf{p}_1) \propto e^{-\frac{\mathbf{p}_1^2}{2m k_{\mathrm{B}} T}}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.3.11)

This is the Maxwell distribution.

Non-ideal gas. General classical system

lecture11Fig1

Fig 1: Partitioning out a subset of a larger system

Breaking the system into a subsystem 1 and the reservoir 2 so that with

\begin{aligned}H = H_1 + H_2\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.4.12)

we have

\begin{aligned}\Omega(N, V, E) &= \int d\{x_1\}d\{p_1\}d\{x_2\}d\{p_2\}\delta( E - H_1 - H_2 ) \frac{1}{{ h^{3N_1} N_1! h^{3 N_2} N_2!}} \\ &\propto \int d\{x_1\}d\{p_1\}e^{\frac{1}{{k_{\mathrm{B}}}} S(E - H_1, N - N_1)}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.4.13)

\begin{aligned}\Omega(N, V, E) \sim \int d\{x_1\}d\{p_1\}\underbrace{e^{\frac{1}{{k_{\mathrm{B}}}}S(E, N)}e^{-\frac{N_1 }{k_{\mathrm{B}}}\left(  \frac{\partial {S}}{\partial {N}}  \right)_{E, V}}}_{\text{``environment'', or ``heat bath''}}e^{-\frac{H_1 }{k_{\mathrm{B}}}\left(  \frac{\partial {S}}{\partial {E}}  \right)_{N, V}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.4.14)

\begin{aligned}H_1 = \sum_{i \in 1} \frac{\mathbf{p}_i}{2m}+\sum_{i \in j} V(\mathbf{x}_i - \mathbf{x}_j)+ \sum_{i \in 1} \Phi(\mathbf{x}_i)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.4.15)

\begin{aligned}\mathcal{P}  \propto e^{-\frac{H( \{x_1\} \{p_1\} ) }{k_{\mathrm{B}} T} }\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.4.16)

and for the subsystem

\begin{aligned}\mathcal{P}_1 =\frac{e^{-\frac{H_1}{k_{\mathrm{B}} T} }}{\int d\{x_1\}d\{p_1\}e^{-\frac{H_1}{k_{\mathrm{B}} T} }}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.4.17)

Canonical ensemble

Can we use results for this subvolume, can we use this to infer results for the entire system? Suppose we break the system into a number of smaller subsystems as in fig. 1.2.

lecture11Fig2

Fig 2: Larger system partitioned into many small subsystems

\begin{aligned}\underbrace{(N, V, E)}_{\text{microcanonical}}\rightarrow (N, V, T)\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.5.18)

We’d have to understand how large the differences between the energy fluctuations of the different subsystems are. We’ve already assumed that we have minimal long range interactions since we’ve treated the subsystem 1 above in isolation. With \beta = 1/(k_{\mathrm{B}} T) the average energy is

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle = \frac{\int d\{x_1\}d\{p_1\}He^{- \beta H }}{\int d\{x_1\}d\{p_1\}e^{- \beta H }}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.5.19)

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{E^2}}\right\rangle = \frac{\int d\{x_1\}d\{p_1\}H^2e^{- \beta H }}{\int d\{x_1\}d\{p_1\}e^{- \beta H }}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.5.20)

We define the partition function

\begin{aligned}Z \equiv \frac{1}{{h^{3N} N!}}\int d\{x_1\}d\{p_1\}e^{- \beta H }.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.5.21)

Observe that the derivative of Z is

\begin{aligned}\frac{\partial {Z}}{\partial {\beta}} = -\frac{1}{{h^{3N} N!}}\int d\{x_1\}d\{p_1\}He^{- \beta H },\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.5.22)

allowing us to express the average energy compactly in terms of the partition function

\begin{aligned}\left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle = -\frac{1}{{Z}} \frac{\partial {Z}}{\partial {\beta}} = - \frac{\partial {\ln Z}}{\partial {\beta}}.\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.5.23)

Taking second derivatives we find the variance of the energy

\begin{aligned}\frac{\partial^2 {{\ln Z}}}{\partial {{\beta}}^2} &=\frac{\partial {}}{\partial {\beta}}\frac{\int d\{x_1\}d\{p_1\}(-H)e^{- \beta H }}{\int d\{x_1\}d\{p_1\}e^{- \beta H }} \\ &= \frac{\int d\{x_1\}d\{p_1\}(-H)^2e^{- \beta H }}{\int d\{x_1\}d\{p_1\}e^{- \beta H }}-\frac{\left(  \int d\{x_1\} d\{p_1\} (-H) e^{- \beta H }  \right)^2}{\left(  \int d\{x_1\} d\{p_1\} e^{- \beta H }  \right)^2} \\ &= \left\langle{{E^2}}\right\rangle - \left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle^2 \\ &= \sigma_{\mathrm{E}}^2\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.5.24)

We also have

\begin{aligned}\sigma_{\mathrm{E}}^2 &= -\frac{\partial {\left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle}}{\partial {\beta}} \\ &= \frac{\partial {\left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle}}{\partial {T}} \frac{\partial {T}}{\partial {\beta}} \\ &= -\frac{\partial {\left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle}}{\partial {T}} \frac{\partial {}}{\partial {\beta}} \frac{1}{{k_{\mathrm{B}} \beta}} \\ &= \frac{\partial {\left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle}}{\partial {T}} \frac{1}{{k_{\mathrm{B}} \beta^2}} \\ &= k_{\mathrm{B}} T^2 \frac{\partial {\left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle}}{\partial {T}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.5.25)

Recalling that the heat capacity was defined by

\begin{aligned}C_V = \frac{\partial {\left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle}}{\partial {T}},\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.5.26)

we have

\begin{aligned}\sigma_{\mathrm{E}}^2 = k_{\mathrm{B}} T^2 C_V  \propto  N\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.5.27)

\begin{aligned}\frac{\sigma_{\mathrm{E}}}{\left\langle{{E}}\right\rangle}  \propto  \frac{1}{{\sqrt{N}}}\end{aligned} \hspace{\stretch{1}}(1.5.28)

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